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A separate question concerns the destruction of papers by the writer's
heirs. That happened to Austen, whose brothers burned a good deal of her
correspondence. That probably was a great loss, since that censorship was
partly responsible for the "Dear Jane" phenomenon -- e.g., for nearly two
hundred years no one noticed her joke in MP about sodomy in the navy.

Carrol

> -----Original Message-----
> From: T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf
Of
> Nancy Gish
> Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2012 1:30 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Should a writer destroy his papers...?
> 
> Thanks, I think it was the Aeneid I had in my head, though I wonder if it
was also
> Stevenson, or some of his work.
> Cheers,
> Nancy
> 
> >>> "Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]> 11/13/12 2:18 PM >>>
> On Tue, 13 Nov 2012 13:53:00 -0500, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
> > I'm trying to remember a major writer who exacted a promise that his
work
> would be
> > destroyed but then no one would. And that was good.
> >
> >Does anyone remember who?
> 
> On Wikipedia there is a whole list of works destroyed at the page
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_work
> 
> but it also states: Sometimes authors destroyed their own works. Other
times
> they instructed others to destroy the work after their deaths; such action
> was not taken in several well-known cases, such as Virgil's Aeneid saved
by
> Augustus, and Kafka's novels saved by Max Brod.
> 
> Regards,
> Rick Parker