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From "Abortion and the Individual Talent" by Christina 
Hauck (ELH 2003):

But is Madame Sosostris really as ignorant as I have suggested? Identifying
her with the witches raises the possibility that she is not so much the
avatar of a debased religious tradition as a living conduit for "'secret
information . . . which every woman knows,'" information widely perceived at
the turn of the century to represent a threat to masculine hegemony. 63
Indeed, her warning to "fear death by water" suggests knowledge of two forms
of female reproductive control, abortion and postcoital douching, which,
although very different in their intervention, can appear very alike.
According to Potts, Diggory, [End Page 239] and Peel, "Intrauterine
injections with syringes of various fluids to induce abortion . . . may have
been particularly widely used in England." 64 There is, of course, a direct
reference to abortion in "A Game of Chess," which I will discuss below.
Unrecognized, however, is Eliot's reference to abortion/postcoital douching,
contained in "The Fire Sermon." The prostitutes, Mrs. Porter and her
daughter, "wash their feet in soda water" (201), widely taken to be a sort
of ironic allusion to the washing of Christ's feet by the prostitute Mary
Magdalene. Yet critics have noted that Eliot is collating two or more
versions of a popular WWI song. One very telling version goes: 

The moon shines bright on Mrs. Porter 
And on her daughter: 
She washes out her cunt in soda water, 
And so she oughta 
To keep it clean.