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It's an argument for scholars having access to Philip Roth's letters....

On Tue, Nov 13, 2012 at 10:21 AM, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Dear John,
>
> I agree with you, though I feel much more able to bear up under the loss
> of Roth than of Eliot. But I think, while you are right about the pain of
> his marriage, WWI was also a key factor. Many of his letters talk of how
> difficult it is for everyone, and the combination of his marriage with the
> War made for what I think was a life-changing view of the world. I'm not
> sure he would have been ready or able to appreciate Valerie or what that
> marriage meant when he was young.
> Nancy
>
> >>> John Angell Grant **11/13/12 12:38 PM >>>
>
> Phillip Roth says he will destroy his papers so scholars can't root
> through them after his death:
>
>
> http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/11/13/in-which-philip-roth-announces-his-retirement-in-english/
>
> It seems a pity Roth is doing this--an act of selfishness and fear--though
> certainly Roth gets to do what he wants with his papers.  The more I
> re-read and think about Eliot, the more I am sympathetic to the view that
> the misery of The Wasteland was, in significant part, the misery of his
> marriage to Vivien, and his problems with women.  My understanding is that
> when Eliot found happiness in his relationship with Valerie, he wrote no
> more poetry.  What kind of poet would Eliot have been with a happy first
> marriage?
>
> When Eliot's letters to Emily Hale become public, we will understand Eliot
> better.
>
> I hope Roth reconsiders, but that seems unlikely.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Nov 12, 2012 at 2:49 PM, Materer, Timothy J. <
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>> An obit
>>
>> http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/nov/12/valerie-eliot
>>
>
>