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And this is the context for the one US poem of the bunch. Note that the little s. is no mentioned in the poem.
P.



"Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 20:20:40 -0700, P <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>That's quite a respectable shot under the circumcises. However, they look
>more like the Wet Salvages to me. Is DRY some kind of transformation of the
>German DREI meaning 3?
>
>The area has both the Little Salvages and the Dry Salvages. The Little
>Salvages are generally submerged while the Dry Salvages are always "high and
>dry" above high tide (well, not too high and not too dry, due to waves.)
>
>Here is a nautical chart of the area showing the Dry Salvages to the east of
>the Little Salvages.
>http://home.comcast.net/~debee2/Maps/Chart_Rockport.jpg
>
>And the paragraphs below are from a diver's website. Note the danger.
>
>http://www.yellowtangsoftware.com/neadc/diveSites_capeann.html
>
>33 THE LITTLE SALVAGES
>
>The Little Salvages are almost 3/4 mile east of the U.S. Coast Guard
>maintained "aid-to-navigation" bell buoy (red...#2) on Avery Ledge. At low
>tide the Little Salvages have very little water over them, with a 1/4-mile
>long rocky outcropping being visible. Water depths all around this dive site
>range from 15 to 20 feet. The Little Salvages boasts the remains...wreckage,
>actually...of several ships including the recent U.S.S. Grouse (1963)
>
>34 THE DRY SALVAGES
>
>The Dry Salvages stand on the same submerged mesa as the Little Salvages. A
>little over one mile east of Avery Ledge, the Dry Salvages is the top of a
>granite hill the major portion of which is about 4 to 6 feet below sea
>level. Around the perimeter of this dive site the water drops to 30 to 60
>feet deep. The southern end boasts spectacular canyons and crevices. The
>southern end is also the final resting place of the trawler "Racketeer" (1994).