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Short answer…No, this bird is probably not a Bicknell's Thrush.

They're pretty much identical to Gray-cheeked and not really prone to wandering away from the East Coast, as seen in this eBird range map: http://ebird.org/ebird/map/bicthr?neg=true&env.minX=&env.minY=&env.maxX=&env.maxY=&zh=false&gp=false&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=1900-2012&byr=1900&eyr=2012

From Cornell's Birds of North America Online:

"Gray-cheeked and Bicknell’s thrushes very similar in appearance and difficult to identify, especially in the field. Slight average differences in color of plumage and bare parts exist, but these less reliable for identification than differences in vocalizations and morphometrics (Ouellet 1993<http://bna.birds.cornell.edu.proxy.mul.missouri.edu/bna/species/591/articles/species/591/biblio/bib058>, Knox 1996<http://bna.birds.cornell.edu.proxy.mul.missouri.edu/bna/species/591/articles/species/591/biblio/bib047>). Body coloration of both species varies across respective breeding ranges, obscuring differences in all but extreme variants."

Cheers,

Ryan

Ryan Douglas
Postdoctoral Fellow
310 Tucker Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211

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