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"a religious dimension to his poetic experience" -- absolutely!


A dimension that marks every aspect of his verse where

Every phrase and every sentence is an end and a beginning,
Every poem an epitaph. 

What we call the beginning is often the end

And to make and end is to make a beginning.
The end is where we start from. 

CR


________________________________
 From: P <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask] 
Sent: Sunday, September 2, 2012 11:00 PM
Subject: Re: Ritual and Experiment in Eliot's Early Poetry
 

Who is to know?  I get the impression that he discovered //a religious dimension to his poetic experience// and so set about discovering where that led him.
Cheers,
Peter M.

Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


An occasion for me to reaffirm -- vis-a-vis Eliot's early poetry -- that it is here, for the first time perhaps, that the aesthetics of poetry has so subtly been wedded to the absolutes of a religious belief. 

CR


________________________________
 From: Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask] 
Sent: Saturday, September 1, 2012 10:56 AM
Subject: Ritual and Experiment in Eliot's Early Poetry
 

sharing a reading

Ritual and Experiment in Modern Poetry
Jacob Korg
Palgrave Macmillan, 1995 - 240 pages 

"Korg's study illuminates the manner in which the major poets of the early twentieth century attempted to overcome the division between the cultures of religion and science." 

http://books.google.com/books?id=IUHvdHCSs5gC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false 

Chapter 4 (pp. 39-56) on 'TS Eliot's Early Poems' is a fascinating study on the subject. 
Jacob Korg is professor emeritus of English at the University of Washington. 

CR