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I love these self-imploding pronouncements. Nothing comes from nothing 
--- turns out it's true!

Ken A


On 9/13/2012 6:23 PM, Nancy Gish wrote:
> In my judgement, placing him above Donne and Hopkins is utterly false. 
> Anyone can call anyone "greatest": it does not mean much.
> Nancy
>
> >>> Chokh Raj 09/13/12 5:59 PM >>>
> The Guardian article
>
> Which religious poets do you love?
> Andrew Brown
> 1 June 2009
> guardian.co.uk
>
> "[T]he most powerful English religious poet started off as an American.
> There is something in the solemn and desolate music of The Waste Land
> which conveys to me an idea of god by absence and by indirection."
>
> http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/andrewbrown/2009/jun/01/religion-poetry 
>
>
> CR
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]>
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Sent:* Thursday, September 13, 2012 9:59 AM
> *Subject:* TS Eliot, the greatest religious poet?
>
> If the lost word is lost, if the spent word is spent
> If the unheard, unspoken
> Word is unspoken, unheard;
> Still is the unspoken word, the Word unheard,
> The Word without a word, the Word within
> The world and for the world;
> And the light shone in darkness and
> Against the Word the unstilled world still whirled
> About the centre of the silent Word.
>
> ---
>
> That is what I had read in an article in The Guardian (UK).
> It resonated well with what I had felt all along.
> It raises certain questions, though, of how and why.
> We need to raise them and answer them as best we can.
> I'd love to share my feelings on the subject.
> The list is welcome.
>
> CR
>