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Along this discussion topic.
 
One other possibility that may or may not affect the decrease in the window strike numbers is a sobering thought.
 
One could speculate there exists a possitive correlation in the decrease in window strike evidence when compared to the possible drop in local population of resident birds as a result of previous window strikes. Statistically speaking, less birds = less window strikes.
 
I tend to believe the positive hypothesis that the residents HAVE learned the hazzards of their neighboring buildings. There's a reason my wife calls me an eternal optimist. It's in part that I hope for the best in most things!
 
Let's hope the building managers/owners are open to attempts to reduce these type window strikes.
 
Currently at home, we have a male N. Cardinal that is incessantly and emphatically striking our windows. . . and so it starts. . . It's an annual event that lasts into the summer months. It's quite comical to watch the indoor cats and dogs freak out when the Cardinal starts.
 
Bird on!

Chris Barrigar
 
Stoddard Co.
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Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2012 13:55:55 -0700
From: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: WashU Bird Strikes
To: [log in to unmask]

That certainly seems possible as well. Obviously, if birds do learn and pass on knowledge of a dangerous building, it would only affect birds that nest near the building itself. Last summer, I found a yellow-billed cuckoo out back that had been rather neatly gutted and it's insides eaten but it's body left mainly intact. I presented the situation to this listserv, and the concensus seemed to be that the cuckoo probably had been killed by some accidental means then ravaged by an opportunist. There had been a violent storm in the days prior, but a building strike could have been the cause of death too. 
 
If that's the case, I should really be thankful to the scavangers because the usual reaction to a dead bird around here is, "Amy!" As if I have some sort of affinity for dead avians. I usually deposit the bird in the woods and wish it a kind return to the earth. (Incidently, "Amy!" is also the typical response to a lizard, frog, rodent or any other "creature" that gets in the building, which are also returned to the woods in whatever state they're found.)*
 
Amy J. Hoffman
Jefferson City
Cole County
 
*Disclaimer: Except spiders. I don't do spiders.
 
Food helps those who help themselves.

From: Jeff Witters <[log in to unmask]>
To: Amy J. Hoffman <[log in to unmask]>
Cc: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 3:41 PM
Subject: Re: [MOBIRDS-L] WashU Bird Strikes

Amy mentioned decreasing strikes over time and the possibility of learning by affected animals.  I wonder if the decreased evidence of strikes could be due to learning by other animals besides birds. 
 
Given the numbers of cats, foxes, opossums, and raccoons in urban areas, perhaps some of them have put the building's perimeter on their nightly foraging rounds.  Migrants are more likely to be on the move during hours of darkness or poor light, and be unfamiliar with the structures present.  But, not much evidence left in the morning for humans to notice?
 
Jeff Witters
Olathe, KS

On Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 12:35 PM, Amy J. Hoffman <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
The best way to prevent bird strikes on new buildings is to design them to prevent it. Once they're built, the options are limited and visually bulky. Even when you consider putting a fine mesh or a see-through advertisement on a window, building owners are likely to balk. I know that's the case with my office building, one wall of which is entirely glass. When you run into owners or managers who don't care about conservation, you're pretty much stuck. Even at a place like WashU, where you might be able to find more sympathetic listeners, what can you do when an entire building's exterior is reflective? I wish more architects would push eco-friendly options (to address bird strikes as well as other issues), but unfortunately, it's just not always a priority.
 
I will offer this: We've been in this office with the big window-wall for nearly three years now, and the number of bird strikes has decreased. Perhaps the birds learn and pass the knowledge on to their young?
 
Amy J. Hoffman
Jefferson City
Cole County
 
Food helps those who help themselves.

From: John Newman <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: WashU Bird Strikes

Ben

Bird Safe Standards for Buildings (San Francisco Planing) addresses the problem comprehensively.

John Newman
St. Louis

On Mar 27, 2012, at 10:47 AM, Ben Solomon wrote:

> Hi everyone
>
> Some of you may be familiar with the new building at the WashU medical campus that was completed a little over a year ago. Unfortunately, I have anecdotally noticed that this building seems to be causing a surprisingly large number of fatal bird strikes. In addition to the resident sparrows and pigeons, I've seen multiple species of warblers and ducks that have flown into the windows. Sadly, this week one of the Peregrine Falcons, chasing something, slammed into a window so hard that it shattered the glass. I don't know for sure, but was told that the falcon didn't survive and by the look of the glass, I'd be surprised if it did. The building's exterior is almost exclusively large reflective glass, which I might guess is the problem. I know there are solutions to preventing bird strikes in your home, but a solution for a large university building seems more difficult. If anyone has any knowledge of instances where large buildings like this have been "bird-strike-proofed" I would be interested to hear it so that I might be able to pass it on to someone involved in facilities management. Thank you!
>
> Ben
> St. Louis
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------------------------------------------------------------
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Questions or comments? Email the list owners:
mailto://[log in to unmask]
ABA Birding Code of Ethics
http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html



------------------------------------------------------------
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Questions or comments? Email the list owners:
mailto:[log in to unmask]
ABA Birding Code of Ethics
http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html
------------------------------------------------------------
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
Questions or comments? Email the list owners:
mailto:[log in to unmask]
ABA Birding Code of Ethics
http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html