The best way to prevent bird strikes on new buildings is to design them to prevent it. Once they're built, the options are limited and visually bulky. Even when you consider putting a fine mesh or a see-through advertisement on a window, building owners are likely to balk. I know that's the case with my office building, one wall of which is entirely glass. When you run into owners or managers who don't care about conservation, you're pretty much stuck. Even at a place like WashU, where you might be able to find more sympathetic listeners, what can you do when an entire building's exterior is reflective? I wish more architects would push eco-friendly options (to address bird strikes as well as other issues), but unfortunately, it's just not always a priority.
 
I will offer this: We've been in this office with the big window-wall for nearly three years now, and the number of bird strikes has decreased. Perhaps the birds learn and pass the knowledge on to their young?
 
Amy J. Hoffman
Jefferson City
Cole County
 
Food helps those who help themselves.

From: John Newman <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 11:30 AM
Subject: Re: WashU Bird Strikes

Ben

Bird Safe Standards for Buildings (San Francisco Planing) addresses the problem comprehensively.

John Newman
St. Louis

On Mar 27, 2012, at 10:47 AM, Ben Solomon wrote:

> Hi everyone
>
> Some of you may be familiar with the new building at the WashU medical campus that was completed a little over a year ago. Unfortunately, I have anecdotally noticed that this building seems to be causing a surprisingly large number of fatal bird strikes. In addition to the resident sparrows and pigeons, I've seen multiple species of warblers and ducks that have flown into the windows. Sadly, this week one of the Peregrine Falcons, chasing something, slammed into a window so hard that it shattered the glass. I don't know for sure, but was told that the falcon didn't survive and by the look of the glass, I'd be surprised if it did. The building's exterior is almost exclusively large reflective glass, which I might guess is the problem. I know there are solutions to preventing bird strikes in your home, but a solution for a large university building seems more difficult. If anyone has any knowledge of instances where large buildings like this have been "bird-strike-proofed" I would be interested to hear it so that I might be able to pass it on to someone involved in facilities management. Thank you!
>
> Ben
> St. Louis
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