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http://www.paradisebirding.com/picidae/HybridSapsuckers.pdf

 

Here is a pdf on recognizing hybrid sapsuckers.  I haven’t spent much time looking at it but you might find it interesting. You all remember Steven?

 

brad

 

From: Missouri Wild Bird Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jim Zellmer
Sent: Friday, March 23, 2012 2:59 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: sapsucker discussion

 

I too will claim absolutely no expertise on this subject and I will include also, that I will not offer any opinion. I would like to offer another account of a bird found several years ago at Burr Oak Woods CA, by Mark McKellar, then the Naturalist at BOW. He was leading a morning field trip there at BOW with a small group, when he spotted what was first thought was a Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker. Upon closer observation, Mark decided that it was in fact a Red-Naped Sapsucker and got all excited.

 

Pictures were taken by Mike Beck, an article was written for the KC Star newspaper and everyone wanted to see this bird of the west. The pictures were sent to experts (as I remember the way this went) and were reviewed. Bottom line, it was declared that there were too many confusing issues with the bird in question and that this specimen could very well be a hybrid. I believe that the MBRC rejected it on "inefficient or conclusive identification marks" (don't quote me on that part, it has been a good number of years). And that it was most likely a variation of the Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker. I'm still waiting to see my first Red-Naped Sapsucker here in Missouri.

 

Jim Zellmer

Blue Springs, MO

Jackson County

 



--- On Fri, 3/23/12, Edge <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


From: Edge <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: sapsucker discussion
To: [log in to unmask]
Date: Friday, March 23, 2012, 8:38 AM

I claim absolutely no expertise on this, and offer no opinion, only a reference to past discussion.

 

There was a sapsucker, I believe in Lawrence, KS, some years ago, that was thought to be a Red-naped because of physical features.  The bird was collected (ornithology-speak for "shot") and determined to be an old female Yellow-bellied.  If I recall the subsequent discussion correctly, further research revealed that as female yellow-bellies age, they assume characteristics similar to Red-Naped.

 

I'd certainly welcome some clarification here, perhaps from the Missouri or Kansas rare bird committees?  It would be instructive to us all to learn how the bird in Bill's photos is similar/dissimilar to the one in Kansas.

 

Edge Wade

Columbia, MO

 

On Mar 23, 2012, at 8:14 AM, Lawrence Herbert wrote:



    Bill R's photos make for an interesting argument

    for Red-naped.  The double bars down the back,

    obvious in one photo, don't seem to be like our

    Yellow-bellied, IMO.  Or, at least I haven't noticed

    the Yellow-bellied  back like that.

    Larry Herbert,  Joplin, Jasper Co., MO.  certhiaATatt.net

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The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
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ABA Birding Code of Ethics
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