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On 1/12/2012 12:14 PM, Jerome Walsh wrote:
> An oblique comment on the phrase "strange gods," from a linguistic
> perspective. "Strange" and "alien" are common traditional translations
> of the Hebrew root nkr, which simply means "foreign." Both terms often
> have heavily nuanced connotations in contemporary English--"strange"
> meaning "bizarre" and "alien" meaning "outré." But those connotations
> are not present in the Hebrew and, if read into the biblical phrase
> "strange gods," miss the point. "Strange gods" in the Hebrew Bible are
> simply "foreign gods" or "gods other people worship that you shouldn't."

Seems like "gods other people worship that you shouldn't" was what Eliot
had in mind in ASG.

My search actually led me first to http://bible.cc/deuteronomy/32-16.htm
which has parallel translations of the verse from different versions of the
Bible.  Some of the newer versions do use "foreign gods" in the translation.

Which version(s) do you recommend for a good translation of the Hebrew?

Regards,
     Rick Parker