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Certainly, Rick. They all meld into one. 
 
But all this is too obvious, for all to see, and censure. 
 
What, however, interests me is the etiology of Eliot's anti-semitism.
 
Some of it is obvious in the long history of social prejudice.
 
However, there seem to be larger, and not so obvious, contexts that lie
 
behind Eliot's anti-Semitic stance. On one occasion a critic I posted the
 
link to at the list provided much insight on this.  I can't find it now. 
 
Well, I'd like to keep informed on this. I await Patricia Sloane to 
 
arrive any day. And I look forward to reading her.
 
Thanks,
 CR
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

From: Rickard A. Parker <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2011 1:32 PM
Subject: Re: The Jew in Eliot's poetry (was Re: Eliot and literary culture)

On 10/13/2011 11:15 AM, Chokh Raj wrote:
> Consider this too, if you like.
> 1. Mr Eugenides, the Smyrna merchant;
>
> 2. Bleistein (Chicago Semite Viennese);
>
> 3. "the jew", "Spawned in some estaminet of Antwerp, /
> Blistered in Brussels, patched and peeled in London".
> All three could be variations on essentially the same character.

Why? Because all three are associated with cities?
If so then Mr. Silvero at Limoges COULD be a Jewish landlord.

Regards,
    Rick Parker