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Thank you, Rickard and Mike, for your kind nod. It's heartening. 
 
And now, it was time I risked an observation. 
 
It's an acknowledged fact that Eliot had an essentially dramatic imagination. Most of his poetic compositions including 'Prufrock', 'Gerontion', 'The Waste Land', 'Ash-Wednesday' and 'Four Quartets' are dramatic in nature. As for his plays written expressly for the stage, while some of them, like The Cocktail Party, play well on the stage, almost all of them, IMHO, play exceedingly well on the stage of the reader's "inward eye", i.e. those that do not play well on the stage do read so well as dramas. I wonder if it would be a stretch to claim for 'The Waste Land' the status of a five-act play, albeit unconventional, that reads exceedingly well as a verse play. I visualize the conventional Chorus as a major character here.  ----- Original Message ----- 
 
Regards,
  CR 
 
From: Chokh Raj 
>To: [log in to unmask] 
>Sent: Monday, September 05, 2011 5:25 AM
>Subject: TS Eliot and Poetic Drama
>
>
>where "the verse has new levels to climb to" 
> 
>T.S. Eliot and Poetic Drama
>By Brian Johnston
>http://www.coursesindrama.com/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=153
> 
>a fascinating critique 
> 
>CR 
> 
>