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You would be in good company. When the poem first came out,
someone (I don't remember who) told him he (the person) thought he saw
a dramatic dimension to the poem, and Eliot was very pleased at that.

P.


Quoting Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]>:

> I'm not sure I can say any more than what I've suggested, Peter.
> This is the impression that TWL leaves on my mind --
> there is definitely a dramatic structure though I can't spell it out
> exactly --
> the wasteland scenario reaches its climax with the Fire Sermon --
> and yes, a resolution sets in with What The Thunder Said -- 
> etc. etc. 
> The emotional pattern too is in consonance with the dramatic structure. 
> But I would rather look to the expertise of a drama critic to analyse and 
> chart out the course of what I tentatively call a 'reading' verse play -- 
> both innovative and conventional in its design.
>  
> Thanks,
>  CR  
>  
> 
> From: Peter Montgommery <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 6, 2011 8:02 PM
> Subject: Re: TS Eliot and Poetic Drama
> 
> Eliot wanted TWL to be in 4 parts but Pound insisted on the parallerl
> to an Elizabethan drama. McLuhan gave a paper on this at some point.
> I'll look it up.
> 
> When you say "dramatic" do you mean structurally,
> or emotionally -- as in the opera's not over until the fat lady sings?
> 
> Cheers,
> Peter
> 
> 
> Quoting Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]>:
> 
> > Thank you, Rickard and Mike, for your kind nod. It's heartening. 
> >  
> > And now, it was time I risked an observation. 
> >  
> > It's an acknowledged fact that Eliot had an essentially dramatic
> imagination.
> > Most of his poetic compositions including 'Prufrock', 'Gerontion', 'The
> Waste
> > Land', 'Ash-Wednesday' and 'Four Quartets' are dramatic in nature. As for
> his
> > plays written expressly for the stage, while some of them, like The
> Cocktail
> > Party, play well on the stage, almost all of them, IMHO, play exceedingly
> > well on the stage of the reader's "inward eye", i.e. those that do not play
> > well on the stage do read so well as dramas. I wonder if it would be a
> > stretch to claim for 'The Waste Land' the status of a five-act play, albeit
> > unconventional, that reads exceedingly well as a verse play. I visualize
> the
> > conventional Chorus as a major character here.  ----- Original Message
> ----- 
> >  
> > Regards,
> >   CR 
> >  
> > From: Chokh Raj 
> > >To: [log in to unmask] 
> > >Sent: Monday, September 05, 2011 5:25 AM
> > >Subject: TS Eliot and Poetic Drama
> > >
> > >
> > >where "the verse has new levels to climb to" 
> > > 
> > >T.S. Eliot and Poetic Drama
> > >By Brian Johnston
> > >http://www.coursesindrama.com/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=153
> > > 
> > >a fascinating critique 
> > > 
> > >CR 
> > > 
> > >