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I note this post is riddled with typos -- poor vision plus a new 
keyboard with keys closer together.

Carrol
]
P.S. Outlook caught my misspelling of my own name just now.

On 6/29/2011 1:42 PM, Carrol Cox wrote:
> These seem pretty good fundamental explanations of "deep lane," BUT --
>
> Although we know that Eliot got the name "Prufrock" from an actual name,
> we can assume that he chose it out of all possible 5-syllable names for
> other reasons, the pinning down of which is one of the great happy
> sports for readers and critics of Eliot. Some of those 'reasons' for
> "deep lane" are elaborated in Mark Doty's remarks as quoated by Nancy. I
> don't think that ends the chase however. The euphony of the name as Mark
> points out probably _also_ was felt by those who originally (How long
> ago? 16th-c maybe?) who first named the roads. And each of the the words
> has its own history, prior to and continuing after their linkage in this
> phrase, and both words, in cliche and in powerful verse and prose, link
> time and space: e.g., the deep gulf of time, etc etc etc. This poem
> begins with ends and beginnings, both of which are both spacial and
> temporal terms. (References to an 'Eliot" do also -- the space of the
> Atlantic ocean across which they had to pass (long ago) for t.s.e to sit
> in London contemplating in memory the river which flows so endlessly
> (sdpace and time again). (These are just bits, meaningless in themselves
> until linked into somepattern, but I think theya re good bits to follow
> up.) And one last link: One can still today see the ddp ruts left by
> wagon Wheels on the Oregon trail. (And a much lesser poet writes: "And
> deepen on Plamira's streets / The wheel ruts in the ruined stone" (that
> is time passing).
>
> Carrol
>
> Carrol
>
> On 6/29/2011 12:12 PM, Nancy Gish wrote:
>> P.S. This is from the poet, Mark Doty's comments. There are, it turns
>> out, place names called "Deep Lane" in both England and the US. Eliot
>> may have been thinking of them or of the implications Doty notes here
>> about an American one:
>>
>>
>> "I took this picture last week, in the late afternoon, in Amagansett,
>> down the road a couple of miles south of our house here. Deep Lane is
>> the most beautiful name for a road I've ever heard, I think: the two
>> monosyllables, the two long vowels, with the higher pitched vibration
>> of the 'e' and the more soothing relaxation of the throat required to
>> produce 'a.' And then there are the suggestions of the words
>> themselves: the road is deep because it dips, just before the patch
>> you see here, but it might also be deep in the country, or deep in
>> memory or in one's regard, or it might carry one deep into -- what?
>> And "lane," doesn't that speak for itself? A lane is modest, it
>> doesn't go anywhere of note, it's unimportant in the larger scheme of
>> things. "Lane" speaks of domesticity and familiarity, a kind of ease.
>> "Lane" is to "road" as "cottage" is to "house."
>>
>> Those are part of a flock of sixteen or so wild turkeys; the others
>> are off to the left, down in a little clearing. I've never seen so
>> many together at once.
>>
>> The dark object in the lower right hand corner is the front left
>> fender of my car: I stopped while the turkeys continued, in groups of
>> three or four, joining the flock."
>>
>> Posted by Mark Doty at 7:28 PM
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>>> "Materer, Timothy J." 06/29/11 11:40 AM>>>
>> Can anyone say what Eliot might mean in East Coker by "electric heat"?
>>
>> "And the deep lane insists on the direction / Into the village, in the
>> electric heat / Hypnotised."
>>
>> Maybe it has to do with the etymology of the word?
>>
>> Also, a question for those who are better acquainted with the mother
>> tongue, is "deep lane" Eliot's original image, or is he using a common
>> term for a road?
>>
>>
>> Timothy Materer
>> English Department
>> Univ. of Missouri
>>