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But Eliot WAS a fundamentalist!  He was usually socially polite about it,
but he was as dogmatic as one can get in terms his own private beliefs.

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2011 2:07 PM
Subject: Re: Allusions, Echoes, Borrowins, etc was OF RELIGIOUS POETS


> Tom Colket wrote:
> > I am not of Eliot's faith, so I ask this question out of ignorance -- In
> > the essay I cited, is Eliot expressing a commonly-held religious view in
> > this passage?:
> >
> > "We desire and fear both sleep and waking; the day brings relief from
> > the night, and the night brings relief from the day; we go to sleep as
> > to death, and we wake as to damnation."
>
> Maybe common but I think not prevalent.  I have trouble thinking of any
> preacher other than a fundamentalist saying "we go to sleep as to death,
> and we wake as to damnation."
>
> Tom, you wrote "I am not of Eliot's faith" so what do you think of the
> line after the one you you just quoted, i.e. "We move, outside of the
> Christian faith, between the terror of the purely irrational and the
> horror of the purely rational."
>
> Regards,
>      Rick Parker