Print

Print


There's a very simple solution to this issue; use the auto-correct
function in your word processing program to automatically turn your
nrws into a Northern Rough-winged Swallow. That way the four-letter
code becomes a useful short-hand and doesn't require other to decipher
the acronyms in order to know what you saw. Just add the auto-correct
instructions to each species as you write your notes and over time
you'll find that it saves a lot of typing. I work with Whooping Cranes
and never write out the full name, instead I write whcr for singular
and whcrs for plural--MS Word does the rest.

Walter Wehtje
Wood River, NE

On Fri, Mar 25, 2011 at 8:49 AM, Dency Kahn <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> I strongly agree.  We have always said on the list that in the subject line
> the bird's name would be written in full; if afterwards people want to use
> the code, at least we do know which bird is meant.  I was totally confused
> by a message with NOSH in the subj line, thought it referred to a snack
> while birding because I am familiar with the work in Brit speak.  There is
> enough to memorize in this hobby with adding this.
>
> Dency Kahn
> St. Louis County
> [log in to unmask]
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: David Becher
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2011 9:37 PM
> Subject: Re: NO SIGHTING -- Comment on 4 letter bird codes
> In my personal opinion four letter codes have no place in messages on
> MO-Birds.  They are vital for banding and useful for field records, but have
> no place in written communications.  By the way, I also detest the use of
> FOY, as a word. Iwill admit it is a usable abbrevation although I would not
> use it.  As for Edge's arguement about not knowing the full bird names, it
> is not valid in my opinion.  The correct four letter codes are not always
> obvious from the names because of ambiguous codes where more than species
> has the same initials or a bird has more than two names and the birds name
> has changed over time.  It is not worth anyone's while to remember if
> Northern Roughwinged Swallow is NRSW or NORS or NROS or ROSW or whatever
> unless they actually use them in the field which I suspect most do not.  I
> do not have the time or interest to memmorize the 800+ codes for US birds
> not to mention the 9000 or more for the rest of the world.  When I read a
> message and have to stop and think which bird the code is referring to it
> wastes my time and reduces the value of the message as communication.  That
> is my opinion, if you want to use them in e-mails go ahead.
> David Becher
> ________________________________
> Date: Wed, 23 Mar 2011 17:58:04 -0500
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: NO SIGHTING -- Comment on 4 letter bird codes
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> I don't think anyone needs to apologize for not using the 4 letter bird
> codes. I personally don't like them, and have trouble reading them. I don't
> think a mobirds email should be treated the same as recording data in the
> field. I do find it interesting that there was an outcry when some birders
> used the scientific (Latin) bird names -- I believe the argument was that
> some readers would not understand them -- even though they could be easily
> looked up. Even easier, it might be argued, than finding the 4-letter codes.
> Plus the Latin names help one learn bird taxonomy.
>
> On Wed, Mar 23, 2011 at 4:14 PM, Edge <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
> The question was asked, "how many more seconds does it take to type out the
> name itself?"
> Few, of course, either typing or writing field notes...each time the name is
> used.  But that's not the only aspect.  The four-letter code is a really
> useful tool.  And that is the most important thing to remember:  it is a
> tool.
> When recording birds seen in the field, those few seconds may make the
> difference of seeing a bird or having your head down, writing.
> When communicating with other birders, it is a quick way to convey
> information.
> I notice that the sender has no problem with FOY.  That is another short-cut
> tool, with the same function.
> I find that many people who balk at the four letter code for bird names
> often do so because they haven't learned the "official" name of the bird.
>  Knowing that a robin is an American Robin; that a goose is a Canada Goose,
> not a Canadian Goose; that a buzzard is a Turkey Vulture, etc.,  is a step
> along the way of learning about birds.  Yes, it is not necessary to ever
> take that step, but it can be a big help in learning about birds, where to
> find them, and what you're seeing when you do find them.
> Learning and using the alpha code is one aspect of learning about birds.  It
> isn't an essential part for some people, but it is used by thousands of
> people as a routine way of recording and discussing bird sightings.  We use
> it because it is a useful tool recognized and employed by birding
> enthusiasts and professional ornithologists in all ornithology-related
> activities.
> Edge Wade
> Columbia, MO
> [log in to unmask]
>
> On Mar 22, 2011, at 8:22 PM, Archie Keiper wrote:
>
> I hit Levee Road in Monroe County (unincorporated Columbia) IL today.  FOY
> Willet, Pectoral Sandpipers (abt 30), and Little Blue Heron.
>
> Sorry -- I am not educated enough to use the four-letter anacronyms for the
> species.  The system seems simple enough, but what do you do with Canada
> Goose vs Cackling Goose, or Barn Swallow vs Bank Swallow?  Besides, how many
> more seconds does it take to type out the name itself?
>
> Archie Keiper
> Columbia, Monroe Co, IL
> [log in to unmask]
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> ASM Website: http://mobirds.org/
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Questions or comments? Email the list owners:
> mailto:[log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Questions or comments? Email the list owners:
> mailto:[log in to unmask]
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> To unsubscribe or change subscription options:
> https://po.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mobirds-l&A=1
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------
> The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> ASM Spring Meeting: April 29 - May 1, 2011 in Kansas City, Missouri,
> http://mobirds.org/Meetings/sprmtg2011.asp
>

------------------------------------------------------------
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
ASM Spring Meeting: April 29 - May 1, 2011 in Kansas City, Missouri, http://mobirds.org/Meetings/sprmtg2011.asp