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Unless you already know it, Mike, the Roman fort on Hardknott Pass between
Eskdale and Wrynose Bottom / Langdale is a very evocative place indeed.

(So, in a very very different way, is the site of Buchenwald Concentration
Camp near Weimar in Thuringia, Germany: even all the birds of the forest
seem not to want to sing around there - a chilling place indeed, with it's
sinister gate proclaiming 'Arbeit Macht Frei' and the concrete and wire
fences and the crematorium still as they were.)

regards

David

On 1 November 2010 10:22, Mike Callaghan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> When I first came upon Stonehenge c.1959 I was walking from Salisbury and
> will never forget turning the corner on the road from Amesbury and suddenly
> seeing, on the open plain-the stones.  I don't think it looks half as
> dramatic these days, maybe wider roads and the fence around it.
> Similarly, some 'monuments' which I used to play on as a kid are now
> tourist attractions.  My prime example is the water wheel which formed part
> of the lead mines in Weardale and is now the Killhope Big Wheel and is
> visited by 1000's (includes a trip down the lead mine).
> I can't match David's experience  but I remember when I was a teenager
> visting a Roman fort late at night (again these places were open then)
> Corstopitum or Corbridge as it is now known.  An eerie experience, but I
> think more to do with my perception.
>
> Mike
>
>
>  -----Original Message-----
> From: Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
>  Sent: Mon, Nov 1, 2010 12:07 pm
> Subject: Re: The Art of TS Eliot
>
>  I confess to a strong fascination with Stonehenge/Arthurian mythology.
> It is a sense of connection to the subconscious or something.
>
> I made a point of seeing it along with Salisbury Cathedral.
> My first impressions were of disappointment. I had made it so big in my
> imagination,
> and it seemed so human and down to earth. Still, givwen what we know
> of it's construction, it is quite phenomenal.
>
> Cheers,
> Peter
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> *From:* David Boyd <[log in to unmask]>
> *To:* [log in to unmask]
> *Sent:* Sunday, October 31, 2010 10:29 AM
> *Subject:* Re: The Art of TS Eliot
>
>
> Re Stonehenge, despite its present sanitization, it's still I think
> thrilling to behold before one, when it first appears into view from the
> highway.
>
> We have a similar stone circle nearby called Castlerigg near Keswick. It is
> magnificently situated itself within a surrounding circle of mountains, and
> consists of an 'inner circle' contained within a wider one.
>
> One day, returning home from a business trip, on a whim I took a small
> detour to Castlerigg, and parked the car and entered the field and gawped at
> the vista in which the circle is set and entered the outer circle and then
> the inner one.
>
> But as soon as I stepped into the inner one it was as if my skull had
> become a pressure-cooker - the feeling of pressure and pain was overwhelming
> and I had to get out of there pronto.
>
> Until this experience, I'd rather scoffed at those who attach mystical
> purposes to these places, but now I'm not so sure at all..........
>
> (this is NOT just made-up for Halloween - it's a true story, believe me !)
>
> regards
>
> David
> Seascale, Cumbria, UK
> On 31 October 2010 17:32, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>
>>   What a parallelism -- unparalleled -- brings the subject to fruition!
>>
>> Thanks,
>>  CR
>>
>> --- On *Sun, 10/31/10, Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]>* wrote:
>>
>>  Reminds me of Eliot's
>>
>> The Auditory Imagination:
>>       =========================
>>  the feeling for syllable and rhythm penetrating far below the conscious
>>  levels of thought and feeling, invigorating every word; sinking to the
>>  most primitive and forgotten, returning to the origin and bringing
>> something
>>  back, seeking the beginning and the end. It works through meanings,
>>  certainly, or not without meanings in the ordinary sense, and fuses the
>>  old and obliterated and the trite, the current, and the new and
>> surprising,
>>  the most ancient and the most civilized mentality. (118)
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>       Eliot,T.S. "Matthew Arnold." THE USE OF POETRY AND THE USE OF
>>           CRITICISM. London: Faber, 1933.
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Peter
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> *From:* Chokh Raj<http:[log in to unmask]>
>> *To:* [log in to unmask]<http:[log in to unmask]>
>> *Sent:* Friday, October 29, 2010 7:21 AM
>> *Subject:* Re: The Art of TS Eliot
>>
>>   The Geometry of Stonehenge: pure poetry
>> http://www.stonehenge.tv/geometry.html
>>
>> Time to puzzle out the architectonics of Eliot's poetry!
>>
>> CR
>>
>>
>> --- On *Fri, 10/29/10, mikemail <[log in to unmask]<http:[log in to unmask]>
>> >* wrote:
>>
>>  I believe the most recent and verifiable research indicates that
>> Stonehenge was actually a place of worship/pilgrimage.  The approaches have
>> been investigated and shown as ceremonial ávenues' or suchlike which
>> prepared the worshipper.
>> Mike
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> *From:* Richard Seddon<http:[log in to unmask]>
>> *To:* [log in to unmask]<http:[log in to unmask]>
>> *Sent:* Friday, October 29, 2010 2:40 AM
>> *Subject:* Re: The Art of TS Eliot
>>
>>  I think man’s facility with using time as a discrete unit of experience
>> has been around for a long, long time.  Witness  water clocks which I
>> believe were introduced during the new kingdom of Egypt.  Astronomical works
>> such as what Stonehenge is reputed to be imply considerable familiarity with
>> time as discrete units.
>>
>>
>>
>> Rhythm, which has been around since Ugh repeatedly knocked one piece of
>> wood against another, uses discrete units of time.
>>  As noted Newton introduced an abstract appreciation of time with his
>> invention of differentiation  in what was to become the Calculus.
>>  Richard Seddon
>> Portales, NM
>>    *From:* T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On
>> Behalf Of *Carrol Cox
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 27, 2010 7:07 PM
>> *To:* [log in to unmask]
>> *Subject:* Re: The Art of TS Eliot
>>    I don’t know. That wasn’t brought  up in the work I learned  this
>> from. It’s an interesting question though.
>>  Carrol
>>  ------------------------------
>>  *From:* T. S. Eliot Discussion forum. [mailto:[log in to unmask]] *On
>> Behalf Of *Peter Dillane
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 27, 2010 7:06 PM
>> *To:* [log in to unmask]
>> *Subject:* Re: The Art of TS Eliot
>>   How did they play music ? pete
>>
>>
>>
>>
>