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I'll skip comments as to "proper" Missouri, except to say that there  
isn't any portion of the state that residents of another portion  
haven't mused about the benefit to all of lopping it off, carving it  
out, dropping it in a major sinkhole, etc.

Loggerhead Shrikes have decreased significantly in central Missouri.   
They are still found in north central and west central counties-- 
areas that are more flat and open with those good fence rows and  
brush piles.

There was a national discussion about 10 years back about the  
downward trend.  Loss of habitat was deemed the (a?) major factor, as  
I recall.  I don't remember if increasing numbers of several raptor  
species was discussed as an important factor.

Edge Wade
Columbia, MO
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On Oct 25, 2010, at 6:53 AM, Chris Barrigar wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> I'll chime in . . . speaking for the southeast region (which I know  
> is not considered MO proper), in the three years I've lived here, I  
> watched steady numbers of Loggerhead Shrikes (LOSH) here in the  
> bootheel.
>
> I know of four nesting pairs within 1 mile of Otter Slough CA  
> extending in various directions, predominantly East of the CA.
>
> I am also familiar with at least four other locations throughout  
> the bootheel where I regularly observe LOSH's in passing.
>
> Also it seems that if travelling in a new area and a cotton field  
> is present, watching utility wires and posts or other prominent  
> points, is a good place to spot one.
>
> Whether they are decreasing in number, I cannot answer, but they  
> seem to be holding their numbers here in the bootheel - at least  
> that I have observed.
>
> That being said, this year/summer there seems to be much work on  
> removing trees/shrubs growing along old fence rows and mainly along  
> drainage ditches, canals, creeks, etc. that has me wondering what  
> impact this will have on these nesting pairs. I'm guessing that  
> after this year's "cleanup" of said ditches, the LOSH's may need to  
> look elsewhere for suitable nest sites. It will be interesting  
> whating this next spring.
>
> For what it's worth . . .
>
> Cheers!
>
> Chris Barrigar
>
> Stoddard Co.
> [log in to unmask]
> [log in to unmask]
>
> http://community.webshots.com/user/photosbychris
>
> http://community.webshots.com/user/photosbychris1
>
>
>
>
>
> Date: Sat, 23 Oct 2010 21:58:43 -0500
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: N. Shrike - discussion topic
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> On October 21, someone posted a Northern Shrike to the Iowa list.  
> For most of the 38 years that I have lived in Missouri, I have  
> thought of Northern Shrike as an irruptive species that makes it to  
> our state in numbers of more than one or two only occasionally. Yet  
> there have been so many reports of NOSH in recent years that I'm  
> beginning to suspect that they are annual migrants to Iowa and  
> Northern Missouri. Perhaps they have been here all along during  
> most winters. We're just finding more of them now because we've  
> learned to expect them and more people have learned how to identify  
> them.
>
> Does anyone agree? Disagree? Have a third perspective?
>
> Meanwhile, Loggerhead Shrike numbers seem to be falling, both in  
> summer and in winter. Does anyone have any ideas about that?
>
> Bob Fisher
> Independence, MO
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