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That's Faith, I think,  CR !!

Regards

David

On 21 July 2010 23:12, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>   a word of good cheer
>
> "And all shall be well and
> All manner of thing shall be well
> By the purification of the motive
> In the ground of our beseeching."
>
> CR
>
>
> --- On *Wed, 7/21/10, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]>* wrote:
>
> Thanks, David. Eliot, however, underscores an essential distinction in his
> Introduction to Charles William's All Hallows' Eve, as well as in The Dry
> Salvages, V -- it is one of motivation:
>
> "[I]f 'mysticism' means a belief in the supernatural, and in its operation
> in the natural world, then Williams was a mystic: but that is only belief in
> what adherents of every religion in the world profess to believe. His is //a
> mysticism, not of curiosity, or of the lust for power, but of Love;// and
> Love, in the meaning which it had for Williams -- as readers of his study of
> Dante, called The Figure of Beatrice, will know -- is a deity of whom most
> human beings seldom see more than the shadow. But in his novels he is as
> much concerned with quite ordinary human beings, with their struggle among
> the shadows, their weaknesses and self-deceptions, their occasional moments
> of understanding, as with the Vision of Love towards which creation
> strives." [Intro to ALL HALLOWS' EVE]
>
>                     "But to apprehend
> The point of intersection of the timeless
> With time, is an occupation for the saint -—
> No occupation either, but something given
> And taken, in a lifetime's death in love,
> Ardour and selflessness and self-surrender."
>
> http://www.tristan.icom43.net/quartets/salvages.html
>
> CR
>
>
> --- On Wed, 7/21/10, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]<http:[log in to unmask]>>
> wrote:
>
> > Just to add, tangentially, that all this chimes rather with the subject
> of a most interesting talk I was privileged to listen to last week by Ron
> > Schuchard, on the topic of Shamanic Possession as it affected Ted Hughes
> and indeed Eliot himself, along with of course, in its various forms, WB
> Yeats.
> >
> >
> > One significant point that was made I think was that Eliot's intense
> spirituality wasn't all that dissimilar, especially in its formative stages,
> to Hughes's, despite the former finally emerging as mainstream religion.
> >
> > - just different name-tags for essentially very similar processes.
> >
> > regards
> >
> > David
> >
> >
> > On 16 July 2010 01:51, Chokh Raj
> > <[log in to unmask]<http:[log in to unmask]>
> >
> > wrote:
> >
> > Wishing someone responded with these lines, I become another and
> > quote:
> >
> > "And I have known the family to call
> >  Him in from the garden for hours,
> >  While he was asleep in the hall."
> >
> > Lord God, thou indeed art ;-)
> >
> > CR
> >
> > --- On Thu, 7/15/10, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]<http:[log in to unmask]>>
> wrote:
>
> > Not forgetting Mr. Mistoffelees! -- "The Original Conjuring Cat"
> >
> > "The greatest magicians have something to learn
> > From Mr. Mistoffelees’ Conjuring Turn.
> >
> > "He can pick any card from a pack,
> > He is equally cunning with dice;
> > He is always deceiving you into believing
> > That he’s only hunting for mice.
> >
> > "And he’s sometimes been heard by the fire
> > When he was about on the roof--
> >
> > http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/772/
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > CR
>
>
>