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Thanks, David. Eliot, however, underscores an essential distinction in his Introduction to Charles William's All Hallows' Eve, as well as in The Dry Salvages, V -- it is one of motivation:

"[I]f 'mysticism' means a belief in the supernatural, and in its operation in the natural world, then Williams was a mystic: but that is only belief in what adherents of every religion in the world profess to believe. His is //a mysticism, not of curiosity, or of the lust for power, but of Love;// and Love, in the meaning which it had for Williams -- as readers of his study of Dante, called The Figure of Beatrice, will know -- is a deity of whom most human beings seldom see more than the shadow. But in his novels he is as much concerned with quite ordinary human beings, with their struggle among the shadows, their weaknesses and self-deceptions, their occasional moments of understanding, as with the Vision of Love towards which creation strives." [Intro to ALL HALLOWS' EVE]

                    "But to apprehend
The point of intersection of the timeless
With time, is an occupation for the saint -—
No occupation either, but something given
And taken, in a lifetime's death in love,
Ardour and selflessness and self-surrender."

http://www.tristan.icom43.net/quartets/salvages.html          

CR


--- On Wed, 7/21/10, David Boyd <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Just to add, tangentially, that all this chimes rather with the subject of a most interesting talk I was privileged to listen to last week by Ron
> Schuchard, on the topic of Shamanic Possession as it affected Ted Hughes and indeed Eliot himself, along with of course, in its various forms, WB Yeats.
> 
>  
> One significant point that was made I think was that Eliot's intense spirituality wasn't all that dissimilar, especially in its formative stages, to Hughes's, despite the former finally emerging as mainstream religion.
>  
> - just different name-tags for essentially very similar processes.
>  
> regards
>  
> David
> 
> 
> On 16 July 2010 01:51, Chokh Raj
> <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
> Wishing someone responded with these lines, I become another and
> quote:
>  
> "And I have known the family to call
>  Him in from the garden for hours,
>  While he was asleep in the hall."
>  
> Lord God, thou indeed art ;-)
>  
> CR 
> 
> --- On Thu, 7/15/10, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Not forgetting Mr. Mistoffelees! -- "The Original Conjuring Cat"
> 
> "The greatest magicians have something to learn
> From Mr. Mistoffelees’ Conjuring Turn.
> 
> "He can pick any card from a pack,
> He is equally cunning with dice;
> He is always deceiving you into believing
> That he’s only hunting for mice.
> 
> "And he’s sometimes been heard by the fire
> When he was about on the roof--
> 
> http://poetry.poetryx.com/poems/772/
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> CR