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Nancy Gish wrote:
> I do not happen to think Eliot ever took occult ideas seriously; I 
> think his references to them are always mocking; but during the time 
> of his early work they were very common among intellectuals as well as 
> the general population and he knew them.  Given that, I find this 
> suspicion very strange. 

    Given Leon Surrette's redaction of Trexler, it seems Peter's 
suspicion was well placed. So much of the "mass of information" coming 
out turns out to be revisionist and axe-grinding in nature, it seems 
only prudent to be suspicious of the next "find" that
> A mass of information is coming out that we did not have before--as 
> example the collected prose is being edited by Ron Schuchard and Jewel 
> Brooker only now, and there has been a stream of other texts since the 
> 1990s that had not been published.  So what is surprising about this?
>  
> Here is the author's short bio:
>
> Adam Trexler is a lecturer at Queen Mary, University of London, where 
> he also completed his doctorate. He is currently revising his first 
> monograph, /Modernist Aesthetics and New Age Political Philosophy: A. 
> R. Orage, Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot/, for publication. The study uses 
> the radical modernist journal /The New Age/ to understand how Ezra 
> Pound and T. S. Eliot employed economic discourse to develop a central 
> strand of high modernist poetry and literary theory. He has also 
> published on Eliot's use of anthropological and occult ideas in his 
> critical method.
>
> And it's in Edinburgh U Press.  It's clearly a serious treatment 
> whether one agrees or not (I haven't read it but think it very 
> unlikely I would--but it's not "suspicious").
>
> Nancy
>
>
>
>  
> >>> Peter Montgomery 07/09/10 1:26 AM >>>
> Interesting, but on first blush I am somewhat suspicious.
> Why is this info coming out only now?
>  
> Cheers,
> Peter
>
>     ----- Original Message -----
>     *From:* Chokh Raj <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>     *To:* [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>     *Sent:* Thursday, July 08, 2010 5:55 AM
>     *Subject:* Re: The Occult in Modernist Writing
>
>     Veiled Theory: The Transmutation of Anthropology in T. S. Eliot's
>     Critical Method
>     By Adam Trexler
>     Paragraph (A Journal of Modern Critical Theory, Edinburgh
>     University Press),  Volume 29, Number 3, November 2006, pp. 77-94  
>      
>     "[T]he article argues that Eliot's early critical theory depended
>     on the paradigms of anthropology and occultism, developed during
>     his philosophical investigation of anthropology and Leibniz. From
>     this investigation, Eliot created an occult project that used
>     spiritual monads as facts to progress toward the Absolute. The
>     article goes on to argue that Eliot's methodology of reading was
>     shaped by anthropology's and occultism's paradigms of
>     non-academic, non-specialist reading societies that sought a
>     super-historic position in human history through individual progress."
>      
>     http://www.euppublishing.com/doi/abs/10.3366/prg.2007.0007?journalCode=para
>      
>     And now critical ramifications of "the occult" !!!
>      
>     Cheers, 
>      CR
>
>