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As a most flippant aside, there's the classic tale of that typist's job
application form, in the form of her answer in the response box headed 'SEX'

she'd written, ' only once, during  a weekend in Brighton, but please don't
tell my mother.'





On 9 May 2010 18:51, Nancy Gish <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>  I think you are not clear because the text is not definitive.  It could
> be any or all of these.  What is known is that he is a merchant with dried
> fruit and that the proposition--at that time--involved a place known for gay
> encounters.  Eliot claimed not to have been thinking of that, but then he
> said many things at many times, one being that he was only one reader of his
> own work.  The text still says what does regardless of whether he was
> somehow totally unaware of those connotations (probably pretty unlikely),
> and the text only reports the encounter, not the meaning.  How can one
> assert absolutely who misjudges or if anyone does?
> Nancy
>
> >>> Terry Traynor 05/09/10 12:52 PM >>>
>
> In the exchange below, I'm not clear about who is supposed to be doing the
> misjudgement. Is it that:
> a) Mr. Eugenides misjudges the narrator in thinking that a stranger would
> want to spend a weekend with him?
> b) The narrator misjudges Mr. Eugenides in thinking that Mr. Eugenides is
> propositioning him?
> c) The reader misjudges the text in not realizing that Mr. Eugenides is
> propositioning the narrator?
>
> > the change in languages, the misjudgement of a stranger's
> > interest on spending a weekend with him,
> > possibly as a failure of adaptation, everything about Eugenides
> > says he is displaced and trying to prevail in a foreign culture.
>
> > Why do you say there is a "misjudgement" of a stranger's interest
> > on spending a weekend with the narrator? What in the text says
> > that Mr. Eugenides is not propositioning the narrator when he asks
> > him to lunch at the Cannon Street Hotel followed by a weekend at
> > the Metropole?
>
> Terry
>