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That is a good piece Drew. But the next question is.... Where is the money or fall-outs from the supposedly corrupt Eastern Euorpean  leadership kept? Is it in Western European or/and Swiss bank? And who is profitting from this?

It is just the same like the neo-colonail stooges in Africa.
And the EU just as they guys you mention in Eastern Europe, enjoy the status quo.

Imaginary, this is what the Eu says, "Steal money, save in in our banks and give us your natural resources,  in return, we will give you and your colleagues  protection since we are military and technologically superior.

I would like to know where the supposed operators of  the criminal gangs in Eastern Europe save their money and get other equipment for their business.

I get the feeling corruption is becomng an industry as you asserted, with givers and receivers, mostly the bigger states and corrupt leaders of supposedly poorer states.

Those who suffer are the most vulnerable and defenseless denizens.

As an international  student in  Sweden, creating a bank account here is hell or even having a bloated bank account may send investigators behind you. Even as a permanent resident having huge bank accounts will sill attract investigators. Not to talk of creating a bank account for those who  do not have social security numbers-this is almost impossible from what i have been made to understand.

I then wonder, if the same laws are applied to all foreigners, why do we still hear of so many African leaders with huge bank accounts in European nations.

The answer is simple. Corruption is a process. There is a giver and there is a taker. In this case, the African leaders are the givers and the EU seemingly unregulated banks with regards to stolen wealth, are the receivers.

I am presenly carrying out an investigation to that respect to have enough evidence to draw my conclusion.

More ideas are welcome.


ALoysius AGENDIA

MSc Student Global Journalism,
Orebro, Sweden


It does not suffice to believe in change, we must believe in ourselves to effect the  change needed. ( Agendia Aloysius)
visit me here...   http://agendia.viviti.com/

  “Intelligence is not necessarily   the explanation of complicated concepts and phenomena. I strongly believe, it is more of our ability to translate these concepts in a way that will change human life in the positive direction. It is  about being pragmatic.” AGENDIA Aloysius
  
Agendia Aloysius 
Masters Student-Global Journalism 
University of Örebro-Sweden 
0046 735817523 
 http://agendia.viviti.com/
http://www.agendiaaloysius.blogspot.com/
www.lebialem.com 
www.leffortcamerounais.com 


--- On Thu, 5/13/10, Drew Sullivan <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

From: Drew Sullivan <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [GLOBAL-L] New project from OCCRP
To: [log in to unmask]
Date: Thursday, May 13, 2010, 10:15 AM

That's because, sadly, there are no real efforts. Powerful people like having their own private army of centurions to protect themselves or their turf.  People in power are satisfied with the status quo. This is tied to anti-corruption efforts. 

Anti corruption efforts are failing. There is talk. There is posturing.  But it will be years and maybe decades before there are real arrests and losses of power or influence.  The countries are not yet ready to deal with confronting corruption.  They might arrest some politically unconnected drug dealers but if there are arrests of truly influential people, they will not be prosecuted. If they are prosecuted, they will not be found guilty and they will not serve time.  In Bosnia, which is all but CONTROLLED by the EU and has international prosecutors, there has not been a single successful prosecution and jailing of an influential politician.  Not one. Not one politician has served a jail sentence. And they've been caught completely red handed. 

This is because of a fundamental difference in perspective.  What you call corruption, many here would call political organization. It is a way of life -- a patronage system that controls all aspects of life -- and I see very little pressure for fundamental change.  People, including many civil society organizations, don't seek to change the political situation.  They seek to join it to gain power and money.  

The EU will keep making demands and the Eastern European countries will keep saying what the EU wants to hear and doing nothing.  But we all know the EU will let everyone in.  They showed that with Romania and Bulgaria.  If they let Bulgaria in, they'll let anyone in. Obviously they don't care enough about corruption. 

But I am not depressed about this.  I see organized crime and corruption as a high growth industry --- Eastern Europe's own capitalistic export.   Hell, Eastern European organized crime has been quickly running your native criminals out of business in most of your big cities and most of you haven't noticed it yet.  Want drugs or hookers in London? Chances are you are buying from an Albanian group. That's good for us who cover it.        ;-)))

******************************************************
Drew Sullivan
Advising Editor
Center for Investigative Reporting (www.cin.ba)
Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (www.reportingproject.net) 
Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
[log in to unmask]
+387 33 560 042 (office)
+387 61 139 403 (mobile) 

-----Original Message-----
From: James M. Dorsey [mailto:[log in to unmask]] 
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2010 5:30 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [GLOBAL-L] New project from OCCRP

This is indeed great reporting. Congtaulations. I would have however liked to have seen a bit more on efforts to counter the phenomena, both domestic as well as on the part of the EU. Perhaps, that is something you could elaborate on.

-----Original Message-----
From: HUNTER Mark [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: 13 May 2010 18:52
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Re: [GLOBAL-L] New project from OCCRP

What a great story.  Not surprising, either.  As Drew knows, the extraction wars in the ex-USSR were fought to a large extent by former state security forces who joined the private sector. To me these trends are the core governance and security issue of the century, beyond terrorism.  Nice work, Drew and the OCCRP.

Best to all

Mark Lee Hunter
Adjunct Professor and Senior Research Fellow, INSEAD Docteur en Sciences de l'Information de l'Université de Paris 2
Portable: (+33) [0]6 27 81 00 87




-----Original Message-----
From: Drew Sullivan [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Thu 13/05/2010 13:55
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [GLOBAL-L] New project from OCCRP
 

You can see our new project on security companies at:  

http://www.reportingproject.net/security/


They began to rise when the old political systems started crumbling.
Trained professional soldiers simply switched to private security companies, protecting banks, schools, money transfers and important people. The work fed their families and gave newly formed governments much needed jobs and security, at least in theory. In reality, the private security sector became its own political, criminal and social force.

By OCCRP

Reporters from the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project investigation spread out across South East Europe to find out who really controls the industry. Researching court records, tax rolls, business registers and government contracts, the reporters found that some of the most powerful figures in organized crime hide behind security companies to arm thugs and intimidate their foes.

Killers, drug dealers and racketeers operate with impunity across the region, often with the aid of political figures and police officers who are supposed to protect the public. Laws are weak, allowing gang leaders to hire and arm convicted felons who otherwise couldn't carry a weapon.
In Serbia, there are no laws at all regulating the security sector.

The investigation also uncovered chilling material showing the influence security firms exert over everyday life.

In Moldova, a minister was caught on tape rallying heads of security companies to pressure and intimidate the population to back the communist party government. If not, they would lose lucrative government contracts. In Macedonia political parties directly control some security firms.

Bulgaria's prime minister made his fortune operating private security companies. Two of his early business partners cast a shadow on this
past: a government agent now accused of operating an organized crime ring for the past decade, and the head of a private security company whose managers await trial for drug trafficking and racketeering.

Security agencies are Bulgaria's largest private employer -- 130,000 people, one in 11 adult males in the country, work in security-related jobs. It's also a haven for racketeers and enforcers who records show force their way into the very companies they are hired to protect, taking shares and money from owners by threatening their families and handing out beatings.

See the whole story at:  http://www.reportingproject.net/security/



******************************************************
Drew Sullivan
Advising Editor
Center for Investigative Reporting (www.cin.ba <http://www.cin.ba/> ) Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (www.reportingproject.net <http://www.reportingproject.net/> ) Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina [log in to unmask]
+387 33 560 042 (office)
+387 61 139 403 (mobile)


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