A friend of mine had a knobby swelling in his knee which made it very
hard for him to walk. His doctor called it a carbuncle. I really think
for a skin phenom to qualify as a carbuncle it has to be largish,
such as are some precious stones including the carbuncle. If you can
rent the Jeremy Brett production of THE BLUE CARBUNCLE you will get to see such a creature. It is also an enteraining story in a Christmasy sort of way.
Jeremy Brett's performance of Holmes is definitive.
 
Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">Tom Colket
To: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
Sent: Sunday, April 25, 2010 11:12 AM
Subject: Re: Narcissus's complexion

Ken wrote:
> You're using the lines selected against to establish what the lines
> ultimately selected mean. Why couldn't it be that the spotted about the
> face lines were excised in order to enrich the meaning of the lines kept?
>
> Ken A
 
It certainly could be, and that's always the issue when using the facsimile edition for anything. I just thought it ws worth pointing out that at one time TSE explicitly said the young man carbuncular has a spotted face. I should have written the post using more speculative language. My only excuse was that it was about 4AM when I wrote it.
 
I did find it interesting that, in the facsimile version, TSE uses _both_ the language of "spotted about the face" _and_ "carbuncular" just a few lines apart. Either the acne is supposed to be an earth-shattering detail that needs immediate repetition to stick in the reader's mind or "carbuncular" is _not_ redundant with "spotted about the face".
 
-- Tom --
 
> Date: Sun, 25 Apr 2010 10:48:44 -0400
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Narcissus's complexion
> To: [log in to unmask]
>
> Tom Colket wrote:
> >
> > Tom Gray wrote:
> >
> > > There seems to be an assumption that the connotation intended for
> >
> > > carbuncular was that of having acne. Why could it not be the other
> >
> > > connotation of being "diseased", "unhealthy", "dirty", ... ?
> >
> > > It would seem to me to fit better.
> >
> > In the facsimile edition of TWL (quoted below), "The Fire Sermon" has
> > additional lines about the young man carbuncular that were later
> > removed. One such line is "A youth of twentyone, spotted about the
> > face". So he has acne.
> >
> You're using the lines selected against to establish what the lines
> ultimately selected mean. Why couldn't it be that the spotted about the
> face lines were excised in order to enrich the meaning of the lines kept?
>
> Ken A


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