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Excellent analysis of Eliot's technique of turning the lofty into the  
sordid. Apparently he or Prufrock placed women's freshly laundered  
underwear with the latter!

Diana

Sent from my iPod

On Apr 20, 2010, at 6:15 AM, "Rickard A. Parker"  
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Ken Armstrong wrote:
>>
>> Just curious how our expectations in poems that start with the  
>> cruelest
>> month and a patient etherized upon a table are raised?
>
>> Just curious how our expectations in poems that start with the  
>> cruelest
>> month and a patient etherized upon a table are raised?
>
> Prufrock starts out high:
>   Let us go then, you and I,
>   When the evening is spread out against the sky
> To drop with:
>   Like a patient etherised upon a table;
> A few lines follow to lead us to an overwhelming question,
> a raising of expectations, to a drop with:
>   Oh, do not ask, “What is it?”
>   Let us go and make our visit.
>
> Likewise there is are risings and fallings in the typist SECTION
> of TWL:
>   The typist home at teatime, clears her breakfast, lights
>   Her stove, and lays out food in tins.
>   Out of the window perilously spread
>   Her drying combinations touched by the sun's last rays,
>   On the divan are piled (at night her bed)
>   Stockings, slippers, camisoles, and stays.
>   I Tiresias, old man with wrinkled dugs
>   Perceived the scene, and foretold the rest--
>   I too awaited the expected guest.
>   He, the young man carbuncular, arrives,
>   A small house agent's clerk, with one bold stare,
>   One of the low on whom assurance sits
>   As a silk hat on a Bradford millionaire.
>
> Regards,
>   Rick Parker
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 08:09:08 -0400, Ken Armstrong <[log in to unmask] 
> >
> wrote:
>
>> Rickard A. Parker wrote:
>>> This actually made me think of the typist scene in TWL where Eliot
>>> would constantly lead us to expect something good only to drop us
>>> down.
>>
>> Just curious how our expectations in poems that start with the  
>> cruelest
>> month and a patient etherized upon a table are raised?
>>
>> Ken A
>>
>>> For example, the expected guest ends up being a pimpled
>>> young man.  Here in the LSJAP passage we are dropped and kicked.
>>> The overwhelming question is not brought up and our attention is
>>> diverted elsewhere.
>>>
>>> This isn't discussing the image like CR is expecting though.  Maybe
>>> it's a bit like drop-kicking the post.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>    Rick Parker
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> The poet chooses to elucidate the image� of Saint Apollinaire  
>>>> En Class in
>>>> 'Lune de Miel'.� One would love to explore more of such� image 
>>>> s as are
>>>> described at some length. Here is another :
>>>> �
>>>> � � � � � � � �  "certain half-deserted streets,�
>>>> The muttering retreats� � � � � � � �
>>>> Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels�
>>>> And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:�
>>>> Streets that follow like a tedious argument�
>>>> Of insidious intent�
>>>> To lead you to an overwhelming question …"
>>>> �
>>>> The amount of pain the� poet took to elaborate on them unders 
>>>> cores
>>>> their� crucial nature apropos the implicit/explicit design of  
>>>> his poetry.
>>>> �
>>>> Regards,
>>>> � CR
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>