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Vishvesh, thank you for the essay.  I read Lady Chatterly's Lover
ages ago and didn't care for it much and so never read Lawrence again.
Thus I don't know much about Lawrence but I have a few links for those
who want to get more details on what Eliot wrote about Lawrence (we
had a good discussion on After Strange Goda not too long ago.)


First, here is what Eliot had to say about
http://world.std.com/~raparker/exploring/tseliot/works/london-letters/london-letter-1922-09.html#paragraph-5
   One writer, and indeed, in my opinion, the most interesting novelist in
   England--who has apparently been somewhat affected by Dostoevsky, is
   Mr D. H. Lawrence. Mr Lawrence has progressed--by fits and starts,
   it is true; for he has perhaps done nothing as good as a whole as
   Sons and Lovers. He has never yet, I think, quite surrendered himself
   to his work. He still theorizes at times when he should merely see.
   His theory has not yet reached the point at which it is no longer a
   theory, he still requires (at the end of Aaron's Rod) the mouthpiece
   for an harangue. But there is one scene in this book--a dialogue
   between an Italian and several Englishmen, in which one feels that
   the whole is governed by a creator who is purely creator, with the
   terrifying disinterestedness of the true creator. And for that we
   can forgive Mr Lawrence his subsequent lapse into a theory of human
   relationships.

An index to an online version of Eliot's Dial articles:
http://world.std.com/~raparker/exploring/tseliot/works/london-letters/index.html

Full text of "After strange gods : a primer of modern heresy":
http://www.archive.org/stream/afterstrangegods00eliouoft/afterstrangegods00eliouoft_djvu.txt


T. S. Eliot on Literary Morals
On T. S. Eliotís After Strange Gods
by Russell Kirk
online at
http://www.touchstonemag.com/archives/article.php?id=10-04-034-f

Regards,
    Rick Parker