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That's the nicest thing I've heard said about Eliot
in the longest time.

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "DIana Manister" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, April 25, 2010 3:11 AM
Subject: Re: Sillying (was: through eliot's kaleidoscope)


> Dear Carrol,
> 
> The shortlist of the most linguistically impressive moderns writing in  
> English would not necessarily be the same as that for the greatest  
> artists. ee cummings for example is a lesser artist  than Bishop but  
> more adventurous and innovative with the medium.
> 
> Wallace Stevens uses language in new  ways but his content is  
> unimpressive. What he writes is less significant than the way he  
> writes it.
> 
> In my opinion Eliot not only innovates with polysemy, multiple subject  
> positions and voices, disjunctive narrative and other formal elements,  
> but does so to express content of great meaningfulness across the  
> whole range of his output including his prose writing.
> 
> None of his peers displays that excellence so consistently in various  
> kinds of writing.
> 
> Diana
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> On Apr 24, 2010, at 2:33 PM, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> > DIana Manister wrote:
> >>
> >> Hah! That's really funny! Eliot could English better than anyone of
> >> his time, . . .
> >
> > Uh? Pound? Yeats? Joyce? Faulkner? Moore? Stevens? Woolf?
> >
> > I can't remember the title or othr phrases, but take a look at the  
> > poem
> > by Moore that contains the line, "We should like to know how that is
> > done." "Englishing doesn't come next better in any time.
> >
> > Carrol
> >