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An understandable mistake given the writing style.
P.
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Diana Manister 
  To: [log in to unmask] 
  Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2010 10:55 AM
  Subject: Re: Eliot on Charles Williams' mysticism


  Dear Ken,
   
  Yes, you are right and I am wrong. On re-reading the excerpt, it's clear that "Deity" pertains to Love.
   
  I guess that's what Carrol meant when he wrote:
   
  "Huh?

  C"
   
  I deserved that!

  Diana
   
  Diana Manister wrote:
  > 
  > Dear Carrol,
  > 
  > Anathematizing descriptions of mystical experience is at least as old
  > as Lao-Tze, who wrote "Those who speak do not know; those who know do
  > not speak." The Cloud of Unknowing takes this position too, as do many
  > texts on the subject. Is it the Torah that forbids writing the name of
  > God?
  > 
  > Images representing God are proscribed by some religions too, aren't
  > they? Buddhism allows representations of gurus and the Buddha, but
  > they are not images of God.
  > 
  > The discussion we had on the list about worship of the Virgin Mary as
  > a deity being prohibited by the church might be informed by this
  > excerpt:
  > 
  > "The Figure of Beatrice...is a deity of whom most human beings seldom
  > see more than the shadow"
  > 
  > Curioser and curioser.
  > 
  > Diana
  > 

   
  > Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2010 12:07:26 -0400
  > From: [log in to unmask]
  > Subject: Re: Eliot on Charles Williams' mysticism
  > To: [log in to unmask]
  > 
  > Diana Manister wrote:
  > >
  > > The discussion we had on the list about worship of the Virgin Mary as 
  > > a deity being prohibited by the church might be informed by this excerpt:
  > > 
  > > "The Figure of Beatrice...is a deity of whom most human beings seldom 
  > > see more than the shadow"
  > > 
  > > Curioser and curioser.
  > Except that your quote isn't what Eliot wrote:
  > 
  > Love, in the
  > meaning which it had for Williams-....-is a deity of whom most human beings
  > seldom see more than the shadow.
  > 
  > "Love," not "the figure of Beatrice," is the subject of "is a deity..."
  > 
  > I didn't really see any ill will per se in Carrol's "mystic" demystification. Just the usual Carroling. Don't tell him I said so.
  > 
  > Ken A


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