Print

Print


Nancy Gish wrote:
>
> The entire poem is in a spatial, co-existing time. Stetson is both in
> the present and the past, but so is Tiresias. He is not represented as
> dead but as a double/soldier who planted a corpse. It's all very strange
> and uneasy, but I don't see it as about the uncanny--unless the very
> premise of the entire poem, in which the nightingale still sings, and
> Tiresias watches the typist and young man carbuncular, and Elizabeth and
> Leicester float down the Thames in concert with the Rhine maidens--who
> are contemporary seduced young women--and Spencer's nymphs depart as if
> they had been there, is all about dead who seem alive. There are dead
> around, but they are generally really dead, like the corpse or Phlebas
> or the white bones.

And let's not forget the alive who feel dead.

BTW - to save a post I want to thank you here Nancy for mentioning the
quotation marks around the Baudelaire line.  You sent a post on this
some time back and I appreciate the change that it made to the reading
of TWL.

Regards,
    Rick Parker