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DIana Manister wrote:
> 
> 
> On Mar 5, 2010, at 6:37 AM, Peter Montgomery <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
>>
> > The poem contains A LOT of Chritian elements and so they need to be
> > dealt
> > with.
> > Are we to pretend they aren't there?

So does Lightr in  August. So the question is, first of all, from what
perspective are we to approach the explanation of these items. In both
cases we have knowledge that it is simply childish to ignore: Neither
Faulkner when he wrote Light in Aughuse nor Eliot when he wrote
Gerontion was Christian. So the interpretive 'problem' involves
expalinng the existence of Christian imagery or references in a
non-Christian poem written within a given cultural context.

I don't care to waste time or energy responding to arguments which begin
with a clear error and by rigojrous logic end up in bedlam. The idea
that Gerontion was a Christian poem is the kind of error that makes
further discussion pointless.

Carrol