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How could he be under a door knob?
How can a door knob be windy.

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "George Carless" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Wednesday, March 03, 2010 12:06 PM
Subject: Re: 'Gerontion' -- the dramatic arc


> Rickard A. Parker ([log in to unmask]) wrote the following on Wed, Mar
03, 2010 at 10:17:06AM -0600:
> > A knob is a hill. Most likely open (unforested) or covered
> > with sheets of rock.  I'm pretty sure that New Hampshire
> > has some peaks with Knob as part of the name.  With
> > my corrupted system searches are a pain.
> >
> > Eliot may have used the word knob instead of hill to bring
> > us back to the house image (door knob).  I think though
> > that he wanted the image of a sphere (as with a door
> > knob) to represent the earth.
>
> (In answer to your question in another email) - There are (K)nob Hills all
over the place... but I don't see
> that Knob as hill makes any sense in the context. A draughty house *under*
a hill?  Or, if it is Gerontion
> who is under the knob, how can he be under a hill while "in a house"?
Sorry if I'm missing something; I'm
> just not seeing where "hill" comes into it.  Why can't it just be a door
knob?  That would tie into the
> "hand on the door," the image of "vacant shuttles (who) weave the wind"
through the halls.  (I'm not saying
> it's *literally* a house, but to me the imagery needs its internal
consistency.)
>
> Regards,
> George