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It didnt make it into any of my Elizabethan references, like SHAKESPEARE'S
BAWDY.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Carrol Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2010 9:16 AM
Subject: Re: Off topic and off color - verb/preposition wordplay


> They were still using leather condoms in the 18th-c. I think there's a
> reference in one of Boswell's books, but it's been a long time and I
> can't give details.
>
> Carrol
>
> Peter Montgomery wrote:
> >
> > BTW, in a somewhat more serious note, in the Inspector Morse
> > series. an episode called "Lost Bus to Woodstock", Morse
> > says something about the Elizabethans using leather condoms.
> > Has anyone ever encountered anything on that phenom. at all?
> >
> > P.
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
> > To: <[log in to unmask]>
> > Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2010 3:54 AM
> > Subject: Off topic and off color - verb/preposition wordplay
> >
> > > I'm offering the possibility of (2) without knowing what it would
> > > mean for a  wind to be "running on."  But I'm also unsure about
> > > whether in (4), a gull "running on" would mean that it's "going
> > > with the flow."
> >
> > Ah!  Those English verb and preposition usages can cause confusion.
> > Witness this bit of risque wordplay:
> >
> > At school one afternoon, little Johnny put his hand up and asked,
> > "Miss, Miss, what does the expression "Tore his leather" mean?"
> >
> > The teacher replied, "I'm sorry, Johnny, what's the context?"
> >
> > "Well, Miss, it says here 'Robin Hood tore his leather jerkin off.'"