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Reminds me of Middlemarch.
P.
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"Brooker's discussion of Eliot and Frazer comprises three main points.
First, she shows that Frazer's work derives its epistemological impetus from
Darwin: "As Darwin had attempted to discover the origin of the species and
chart the descent of man, Frazer and his contemporaries tried to discover
the origin of religion and chart the descent of the gods. They wished to
demonstrate a single evolutionary sequence in the development of religion
from primitive to modern." The argument is not original with Brooker, but
her exposition of it is lucid, and a necessary basis for what follows. Her
second point is that Eliot's writings reflect Frazer's scientific method;
when Eliot spoke of the "mythical method" in his 1925 review of Ulysses, "he
was using 'mythical' . . . as a near-synonym for 'scientific' or
'comparative' or 'inductive.'" With penetrating skill, Brooker traces how
Eliot habitually transformed scientific method in applying it to his poetry;
in particular, she has a fine eye for the scientific metaphors (one recalls
that famous "bit of finely filiated platinum") that enabled Eliot to
formulate a modernist aesthetic."

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Eliot%2c+Frazer%2c+and+the+myhtology+of+modernism.-a018160187