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The Listers, I hope, would have no such misgivings about "old men in shirt sleeves" if they perused my reading of the poem at

http://books.google.com/books?id=GPZHywxqWoAC&pg=PA63&lpg=PA63&dq#v=onepage&q=&f=false

It might dispel many another misgiving, hopefully.

Regards,
 CR



--- On Mon, 2/8/10, Tom Colket <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


> Nancy wrote:
> N> I am now wondering about the function of the
> epigraph. . .
> 
> N> Does the choice of the circle of fraud reveal or
> evoke something about Prufrock?
>  
> 
> I know my Prufrock readings have not gotten much traction
> on this list, but let me give you a reply for your
> consideration. //In a poem about sexuality (a "love
> song"), the epigraph may hint that Prufrock considers
> himself to be a "sexual fraud", in that he has
> homoerotic desires even as he journeys "among the
> women". Remember those "lonely men in shirt
> sleeves, leaning out of windows".//
> 
>  
> 
> -- Tom --

> 
> Date: Sun, 7 Feb 2010 23:06:57 -0500
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Prufrock question (Eliot interview citation)
> To: [log in to unmask]
> 
> 
> I am now wondering about the function of the
> epigraph.  I have long assumed I had figured out a
> reason for it in the need to somehow articulate the meaning
> of being in Hell (note also the two Lazarus stories, making
> three characters who died and could have revealed the
> afterworld but could not or did not).  Eliot's
> epigraphs do not simply chunk another story down in a poem
> whole: they may evoke mood or topic or emotion rather
> than story.  But I am wondering now if the issue of
> treachery or fraud is relevant also.  I had not
> before focussed on the fact that Guido is in that
> circle or that he wants both to conceal and reveal his
> own sin--and cleverness.  
>  
> Does the choice of the circle of fraud reveal or evoke
> something about Prufrock?
> N