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As I have read this poem all my life and have written on it, I have
looked closely at what you describe. Clearly there is a structure of
some kind, but that does not, in itself, constitute drama or plot
structure. Each of these lines describes stasis, not action. And he ends
with no denoument; he is acted on but he has never acted. Nor is there
any clear antagonist. So if your point is that there is some kind of
structure to the poem, it would be interesting to see what it is. It is
not classical plot; that's all.
Nancy


>>> Chokh Raj 02/20/10 9:25 AM >>>
Dear Listers,

Please let me present the four crucial phrases again for your kind
consideration -- the first one in its complete form:

"an old man in a dry month, / Being read to by a boy, waiting for rain."
 
"an old man, / A dull head among windy spaces."
 
"An old man in a draughty house / Under a windy knob."

"an old man driven by the Trades / To a sleepy corner."

I call upon you to kindly reflect on them as part of our reappraisal of
the poem's structure of thought -- and you will find that the monologue
points to a significant involvement of the protagonist in a process of
thought and action . Of that later.

Thanks,
CR


--- On Fri, 2/19/10, Chokh Raj wrote:

'Gerontion' - the dramatic arc

-----

Here I am, an old man in a dry month, [line 1]

I an old man, / A dull head among windy spaces [lines 15-16]

I have no ghosts / An old man in a draughty house / Under a windy knob.
[lines 30-32]

And an old man driven by the Trades / To a sleepy corner. [lines 72-73]

-----

To me the monologue moves along the lines of a classical dramatic
structure -- with an Exposition, a Rising Action, a Climax, and a
Resolution. 

just an observation

CR