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Not that it helps but for completeness the Temple Classics translation
often read by Eliot has "answer were to one."

Regards,
    Rick Parker


Diana Manister wrote:
> *Here are a few translations of the lines in question. I couldn't find John Ciardi's translation, though I searched for it.*
> 
> *Diana*
> 
> *«S'i' credesse che mia risposta fosse*
> 
> *a persona che mai tornasse al mondo,*
> 
> *questa fiamma staria sanza pił scosse;*
> 
> * **Longfellow :*
> 
> "If I believed that my reply were made To one who to the world would e'er return,
> 
> * **Mandlebaum:*
> 
>         "If I thought my reply were meant for one
> 
> who ever could return into the world,
> 
> this flame would stir no more; and yet, since none-
> 
> * Norton:*
> 
> If I could believe that my answer might be to a person
> who should ever return unto the world, this flame would stand
> without more quiverings; but inasmuch as, if I hear truth, never
> from this depth did any living man return, without fear of infamy
> I answer thee.
> 
> * *
> 
> *Henry F. Cary, 1888*
> 
>  
> 
> "If I did think, my answer were to one,
> Who ever could return unto the world,
> This flame should rest unshaken. But since ne'er,
> If true be told me, any from this depth
> Has found his upward way, I answer thee,
> 
>  
> 
> *Lombardo*:
> 
>  
> 
> "If I believed that my answer were made to one who would ever return to 
> the world..."
> 
> * *
> 
> *Dryden:*
> 
>  
> 
> "If I believed (S'io *credesse*) that my response was made (*che mia 
> risposta* fosse
> ) to a person who might (A persona *che* mai)
> 
> * *
> 
> *James Finn Cotter:*
> 
>  
> 
> If I thought that my answer was to someone
> 
>           Who might one day return up to the world,
> 
>           This flame would never cease its flickering.
> 
>  
> 
> 
>  
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Date: Mon, 1 Feb 2010 23:59:33 -0500
> From: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: Prufrock question
> To: [log in to unmask]
> 
> Doubling is not simply the use of a persona; Eliot knew about the 
> psychology and had doubles in his poetry long before "Prufrock."  He did 
> not need a clue from Dante.  See many poems in IMH. Nor do I understand 
> what you can mean by "Eliot's habits of mind."
> N
> 
>  >>> Chokh Raj 02/01/10 9:54 PM >>>
> Peter, going by Eliot's habits of mind (ref. Southam), the epigraph may 
> have provided him with a clue, the all-important starting point, for 
> conceiving this dramatic monologue as a disguised mode of confession [a 
> la Montefeltro in Inferno] -- putting on the persona of a middle aged 
> man. Apart from what "persona" denotes in the epigraph, it could 
> easily suggest to Eliot the technique of "persona" as a masque for a 
> character other than the poet himself.
>  
> Thanks & regards,
>  
> CR
> 
> 
> --- On *Mon, 2/1/10, Peter Montgomery /<[log in to unmask]>/* wrote:
> 
>     Let us not over look Dante's use of the word PERSONA in Eliot's epigraph
>     of the poem.
>      
>     P.
> 
> 
> 
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