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All this discussion from just a silly joke? My goodness!

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Diana Manister" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, February 11, 2010 6:12 AM
Subject: Re: Prufrock question (Eliot interview citation)


> Dear Carrol,
> 
> I know a poet who is tormented by his belief that he is followed at  
> all times. He needs no more proof than that people are walking behind  
> him or look at him from passing vehicles. When he sees a movie he  
> recognizes messages for and about himself. Popular songs refer to him.
> 
> He's as bright and talented as any of us. He knows he's sick, but that  
> awareness alone does not stop the torment.
> 
> He's on anti-psychotic drugs too. And therapy. Have you ever known  
> someone suffering psychosis? It's real.
> 
> My friend's bipolar daughter was awake for 72 hrs, vacuuming the house  
> and washing windows all night. Also on meds and therapy.
> 
> PTSD is real and prevalent.
> 
> I have visited a friend in a mental hospital and it was horrifying.  
> There is serious illness there. Catatonics holdING the same strained  
> postures for days.
> 
> Just because no remedies work doesn't mean none are needed.
> 
> I suffered a prolonged bout of agitated depression in college, but I  
> got a great psychiatrist and meds that eventually worked. But that's  
> probably exceptional.
> 
> Sent from my iPod
> 
> On Feb 10, 2010, at 9:20 PM, Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> >> Nancy Gish wrote:
> >>
> >> I don't know about DSM-IV, but DSM-V is about to come out.  I think
> >> all the categories suspect.  And a worse thing is that as far as I  
> >> can
> >> see most psychiatrists are now not doing therapy but just acting as
> >> dispensers of medications.
> >
> > Agreed on all counts. I rather doubt that _any_ of the current  
> > diagnoses
> > will survive. It is even possible that _all_ mental illnesses are
> > variations on the 'same' one. It is also possible that all the major
> > current ones will be split up, recombined, who konws. And yes, most
> > psycihiatrists do as you say. The best bet is a therapist, but
> > therapists vary wildly (a) in basic competence and (b) in whether they
> > 'fit' a given patient. The same therapist can be wonderful for one
> > patient, poison for another. I think if a person is _really_ lucky and
> > finds a really good psycholotist, the best bet may be to discuss meds
> > with him/her, then have them prescribed by one's own pysician, saving
> > thousands of dollars that way. At the end, before I dropped him, my
> > psychiatrist was charging $100 for a 5 to 10 minute session. How are
> > you, do you need a renewal.
> >
> > A med (an old one, amitrityline) really helped me around 1984, then  
> > for
> > years I took SSRIs, which do help many people, and did nothing for my
> > most commone symptoms, which were not 'plain vanilla' depression but
> > pathological procrastination & anxiety. So finally I got wise and
> > dropped him. I still see a therapist every 4 weeks. That doesn't 'do'
> > anything but it helps me keep tabs on myself.
> >
> > I rather suspect that "paranoid schizophrenia" has as its sole  
> > location
> > crime fiction. I've known, or known the relatives/friends of a  
> > number of
> > people suffering from schizophrenia. None were paranoid, all knew damn
> > well they were sick.
> >
> > Carrol
> >
> >> Nancy
> >>
> >>>>> Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> 02/10/10 4:16 PM >>>
> >> Diana Manister wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Dear Nancy,
> >>>
> >>> My comment on paranoid schizophrenia was off-topic. Prufrock is not
> >>> psychotic, obviously.
> >>
> >> I haven't checked, but is "paranoid schizophredia" in the current
> >> diagnostic manual?
> >>
> >> And incidentally, those who suffer from schizophrenia are said to
> >> suffer from a cognitive disorder. One speaks of "psychotic"  
> >> _symptoms_
> >>
> >> but not ordinarily of "psychoses" as the name of a syndrome. There  
> >> are
> >>
> >> other vaarieties of mental illness that can, in some, generate
> >> psyhotic
> >> symptoms (usually hearing voices." And the patient does not _always_
> >> believe his/her symptoms are "real," but despite t that knowledge has
> >> a
> >> difficuolt time resisting the voices. I had an acquaintance with a
> >> woman who suffered both from defective hearing _and_ from (I forget
> >> the
> >> exact name now) schizoid affective disorder: i.e., she wasn't
> >> "schizophreic" but she did have psychotic symptoms, namely voices  
> >> that
> >>
> >> told her how worthless she was. That she was extremely hard of  
> >> hearing
> >>
> >> greatly complicatted her state. It is true that schizophrenic  
> >> patients
> >>
> >> have great difficulty in separateing reality from 'unreality,' but it
> >> is
> >> not true that ehy always or evn usually do. And of course symptoms
> >> vary
> >> from patient to patient.
> >>
> >> All psychiatric diagnoeses remain suspect pending further research.
> >>
> >> Carrol
> >