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I don't know if I've mentioned this in the last year or so. We have a squirrel proof feeder. It is a standing metal fence post with a piece of PVC plastic 3" (I think) pipe over the post; it is located far enough away from any tree branch and deck that would provide a launching point for a squirrel. But the key for us is an upside down slick-plastic bucket that has no rim to hang on to which is at the top end of the pipe just underneath the feeder. Bob attached to the bottom of the wooden feeder, with screws, a threaded metal pipe fitting flange. He glued to end of an 18" length PVC pipe a connecting plastic flange.  This pipe needs to be big enough to fit over the metal fence post, maybe 2" or less. The hole in the bucket needs to be big enough for this pipe to go through; the larger PVC pipe will hold the bucket under the feeder. The result is a feeder attached  to the length of PVC pipe which slides down into the standing PVC covered fence post. It can be lifted out for thorough cleaning when needed.  Every time there is a new crop of squirrels, the young ones sometimes get up the pole, but they cannot get out of the bucket nor reach it's edge, so go sliding back down. They eventually leave it alone. 

House Sparrows feed on my finch sock feeder once in a while. But since the sock is hanging off the sunflower feeder, I probably can't count what's under the feeder. However, I will mention that one day last week there was a White-throated Sparrow which is unusual for our yard. We have seen White-crowned and Harris Sparrow since Christmas, but just one of each.

Jo Ann Eldridge, Kearney, Clay
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----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Terry McNeely 
  To: [log in to unmask] 
  Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2010 5:39 PM
  Subject: Re: What's Hanging At Your Thistle Seed Feeder?


  I have had as many as 5 Downy Woodpeckers at a time on my four hanging feeders, also Hairy and Red-bellied.  Red-headed when they arrive.


  As to the yard of stove pipes, I discovered several years ago a very effective squirrel deterrent .    I use a piece of PVC (plastic) pipe over my post.  This is slick and the squirrels simply slide back down, however in time the sharp claws scratch enough that they can get a footing.  

  To solve this I simply wipe each piece of pipe with spray Silicone.
  A light coat applied with an old rag will last about a week and it is fun to watch the squirrels leap up only to slide back down.  After several attempts they move on to their own corn feeders.


  Terry McNeely
  25843 Grate Ave 
  Jameson, MO  64647
  Daviess County





------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Date: Sun, 3 Jan 2010 19:58:44 -0600
  From: [log in to unmask]
  Subject: Re: What's Hanging At Your Thistle Seed Feeder?
  To: [log in to unmask]

  The last thing to hang from my last thistle seed feeder was a raccoon.

  This was at least 10 years ago, after I had lost 3-4 thistle seed feeders to raccoons, I decided that was enough.  (My sunflower seed feeder and suet feeder are on tall metal poles far enough from trees that squirrels can't make the leap, and they have raccoon guards. But another pole like that and my yard would start to look like a stove pipe store.)

  Linda Frederick,
  Rolla, MO



  On Sun, Jan 3, 2010 at 6:13 PM, Glenn Pickett <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

    Listers,

    Laura gave me an idea!!   Lurkers and listers......    what is on, or under your thistle seed feeder?
    We are in for a long cold spell, and I suspect that with the expected snow, more and more birds will be working the feeders.  It's too dang cold to venture very far,  all the water is frozen tight.  Let's stay close to home....   and entertain each other.

    So....

    What's Hangin' At  Your Thistle Seed Feeder?

    Rules for submissions:

    1. Birds have to be seen on, or under, the thistle seed feeder in your yard, eating something.

    2. Birds that fly by on the way to the suet, like the Pileated Woodpecker in my back yard, don't count.

    3. Birds that hang out on/under your sunflower, etc feeder, but do not venture to the thistle seed feeder don't count, like the MODO in my backyard.

    4. List any bird that had visited your thistle seed feeder since it has gotten cold....  you know what I mean.

    5.  State if the species is on, or under, the feeder.  If a species is in both places, say so.

    6.  You must state the county in Missouri in which your thistle feeder reside.

    7.  Humor is appreciated.

        
    I'll start:

    American Goldfinch   (on and under feeder)
    Purple Finch  (on and under feeder)
    Red Bellied Woodpecker  (on feeder)

    Dark eyed Junco (under feeder)
    Fox Sparrow  (under feeder)
    White-throated Sparrow (under feeder)
    Song Sparrow (under feeder)
    Tree Sparrow (under feeder)
    Northern Flicker (under feeder)
    White-tailed doe (under feeder)

    (Where is that Towhee????)



    Glenn Pickett
    Columbia, Missouri 
    Boone County
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