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Well, the "Intellectual History of England" in the 18th-c is mostly an
intellectual history of Scotland, the date is not surprising. No one
ever refers to the English Enlightenment, but there are regular
references to the Scottish Enlightenment. As Newman later noted
Cambridge & Oxford were intellectual wastelands, while Edinburgh was one
of the major intellectual centers of Europe.

Carrol

> Nancy Gish wrote:
> 
> Although it is only four [large] volumes (since Scots and English are
> sister languages with most vocabulary in common but a vast lexicon of
> non-English words in Scots) Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the
> Scottish Language is very like it, and it was done much earlier.  My
> complete four-volume set is 1808.
> 
> Interestingly, the editor of the OED was also a Scot.  They seem
> to have been very interested in linguistic studies from very early.
> Nancy
> 
> >>> Carrol Cox <[log in to unmask]> 01/11/10 11:55 AM >>>
> Indeed. And as far as I know nothing like it exists in any other
> language. It is even hard to explain what it is to those whose
> background is another language and who have never consulted it
> themselves. Come to think of it - it is hard to explain what it is to
> English speakers who haven't used it.
> 
> Carrol
> 
> Marcia Karp wrote:
> >
> > As it is.
> >
> > Best,
> > Marcia
> >
> > Carrol Cox wrote:
> > >
> > > William Empson's greatness as a literary critic was closely tied
> to his
> > > love of the OED. This may be a false memory, but I thin he
> occasionally
> > > referred to it simply as "The Great Book."
> > >