Print

Print


A contemporary (but somewhat lesser but nevertheless much underrated English
(Faber) poet published c 1960 a verse play entitled 'Birth by Drowning'
possibly so entitled with an appreciative  nod to Eliot / Prufrock, as was
his poetry collection 'A Local Habitation' to Theseus / Will S.

Regards

David

On Mon, Jan 25, 2010 at 4:44 PM, Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>    "We have lingered in the chambers of the sea
>  By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown
>  Till human voices wake us, and *we drown*."
>
> Since water is a powerful symbol of human subconscious, the drowning here
> seems to indicate the merging of the outer and inner layers of the speaker's
> self. If we take the "you" in the poem to be another person, how do we
> explain this drowning?
>
> CR
>
>
> --- On *Sun, 1/24/10, Tom Colket <[log in to unmask]>* wrote:
>
>  In Eliot's "Prufrock" there are numerous places where the narrator
> addresses or refers to another person, a "you" or a "we".  My question
> is: Is the narrator referring to one specific person (i.e., the same
> person) in all these lines, or is more than one single individual
> being referenced?
>
> Here are the six references (among all Prufrock lines with "you/your"
> or "we/us/our") that I'm particularly interested in:
>
> 1) "Let us go then, you and I . . . Let us go and make our visit."
>
> 2) "And indeed there will be time . . . Time for you and time for me"
>
> 3) "And the afternoon, the evening, sleeps so peacefully! . .. .
> Stretched on the floor, here beside you and me."
>
> 4) "And would it have been worth it, after all, . . . Among the
> porcelain, among some talk of you and me,"
>
> 5) "Would it have been worth while,. . . To say, 'I am Lazarus, come
> from the dead,/Come back to tell you all, I shall tell you all' "
>
> *//6) "We have lingered in the chambers of the sea/By sea-girls wreathed
> with seaweed red and brown/Till human voices wake us, and we drown."//*
>
> -- Tom --
>
>
>