Print

Print


Up to your usual excellent standard, Rickard.
Thank you.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2009 2:27 AM
Subject: Re: Dynamo, Flanagan, and that "third scene" from Sweeney Agonistes


> Tom Colket quoted Haille Flanagan:
>  >
>  > And he [Eliot] went on to develop the point that a poem may be like a
>  > still life, the meaning of which we do not formulate - "We merely
>  > estimate the way the painter has used planes and angles."
>
>
> A travelling art exhibit "Francis Bacon: A Centenary Retrospective
> Exhibition" has made the rounds and has appeared at the Tate in London
> and the Prado in Madrid.  For JUST A FEW DAYS MORE it will be in New
> York at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  As part of the exhibition
> is Bacon's 'Triptych Inspired By T.S. Eliot's poem "Sweeney Agonistes."'
>
> Here is a description of the paintings (see also below):
>
>     Triptych Inspired By T.S. Eliot's poem "Sweeney Agonistes," which now
>     hangs in the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, dates from 1967. It is a
>     very large oil on canvas in three panels; each measures 78 by 58
inches.
>     The one at the left depicts two women, nude, lying down and possibly
>     dead. There are signs of violence or at least carelessness in the
room.
>     In the middle panel a murder has probably taken place, although there
is
>     no body; blood-stained clothes and ransacked luggage strongly suggest
>     that impression. In the right panel two men, also nude, embrace in a
>     manner reminiscent of a pair of wrestlers that Bacon has been painting
>     for many years, based on a famous series of photographs taken more
than
>     a century ago by the American Edward Muybridge. The context is
violent,
>     and at one side of this panel there is the reflection of a man
>     telephoning, I suppose, the police.  There is much here to disturb the
>     spectator's imagination.
>
> For images visit:
>     http://www.leninimports.com/francis_bacon_gallery_29.html
>     http://www.artknowledgenews.com/2009_05_21_03_03_15
>
http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/francisbacon/roomguide/9.shtm
>
>
> Painting description was taken from
>     http://www.vqronline.org/articles/1989/autumn/brown-ts-eliot/
>
> And that is the online version of this essay:
>     T.S. Eliot In the Postmodern Age
>     Ashley Brown
>     The Virginia Quarterly Review
>     Autumn 1989, pp.693-701
>
> This essay is worth a least a quick scan.
>
> Regards,
>      Rick Parker