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I'll buy that.
Thanks Ken.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Ken Armstrong" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2009 1:30 PM
Subject: Re: Eliot's Suppressed Lecture


> O'Sullivan, Brian P wrote:
> > I thought that, since Eliot's concern was homogeneity,
> Strange that this discussion springs itself out of the dead ground of
> its previous fitful incarnation,
> but the Eliotic strange gods and free thinking Jews at least begin in
> these considerations previously
> posted to the list:
>
> "The phrase "strange [=alien, foreign] gods" that provides the title
occurs
>
> once in an unrelated context in the NT (Acts), but it occurs throughout
> the OT
>
> (at least Gen; Deut; Joshua; Judges; I Sam; 2 Chron; Psalms; Isaiah;
> Jeremiah;
>
> Daniel; Malachi), where it is thematic, and whence it gets its deep
> resonance
>
> in whole the Puritan vision of the "City set on the Hill," the "New
>
> Jerusalem," and so forth.  Hence the Chosen People who, in analogy with
the
>
> children of Israel on certain occasions, or with certain ones of them
> always,
>
> are implicitly now following or beginning to follow after strange gods
> are "us
>
> Americans," once descended from the Pilgrim Fathers.   We (the new
> Israel) are
>
> become (or are in danger of becoming) like the Hebrews blasted by
> Jeremiah and
>
> Amos.  Anyone wishing to establish or maintain New Canaan successfully
> cannot
>
> have a proliferation of free thinking Jews.  The same theme is developed
in
>
> the OT under the rubric of adultery (which violates the peoples' marriage
>
> covenant with Jehovah) and the offspring of such adultery..."
>
> As Guy Brown went on to explain, "free thinking Jews" becomes, in the
> context
> of  theNew Canaan, the term for atheists.
>
>
> Ken A