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Nancy Gish wrote (Tuesday):
>
> I've read it too and also don't remember where.

I'm now vaguely recollecting "Affectionately Yours, T.S. Eliot" by W.T.
Levy and V. Scherle but I'm not in the mood to check it right now.

> But do you really consider it wisdom?

Yes. I would call it wisdom. A way to make life go better.

> It seems to me a way to be covertly unkind to those who sent a gift.

Eliot was given a gift and thanked the giver.  If it was unkind of him
to not mention his opinion of it then it must have been more unkind of
an opinion to be expected.  After all, Eliot would have had to read the
book to do it justice and he was busy enough as it was. Besides, if he
wanted to, he could always send his opinion later.

Regards,
    Rick Parker



> Dear Rickard,
>
> I've read it too and also don't remember where.  But do you really
> consider it wisdom?  It seems to me a way to be covertly unkind to those
> who sent a gift.
> Nancy
>
>>>> Rickard Parker <[log in to unmask]> 06/16/09 5:18 PM >>>
>> The OT thread on the phrase and concept "free gift" made me want to look
>> at how Eliot deals with "gifts" and "giving" in his poetry.
>
> On the subject of gifts here is something that I first send after
> Christmas 2007:
>
> Now seems a good time to pass along a little bit of Eliot wisdom.
>
> Eliot said to write a thank you note immediately for every book gotten
> as a gift. That way one avoided having to comment upon its content.
>
> I wish I remembered where I read this.
>
> Regards,
> Rick Parker
>
>