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>German Women's Writing in its European Context, 1700-1900
>(Women Writers of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries Conference Series)
>
>Thursday, 25 and Friday, 26 November 2010
>
>Venue: Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, University of London
>
>Co-Ordinators: Hilary Brown (Swansea University) 
>and Caroline Bland (Sheffield University)
>
>Keynote speakers: Norbert Bachleitner (Vienna), 
>Magdalene Heuser (Osnabrück/Berlin), Susanne 
>Kord (London)
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>Proposals are invited for a two-day conference 
>to be held at the Institute of Germanic & 
>Romance Studies[IGRS] , University of London, on 
>25 and 26 November 2010. This is one in a series 
>of day schools and conferences on women writers 
>of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries which 
>have taken placed regularly since the late 1980s 
>at various universities in the UK and US. The 
>event is organized jointly by the German Section 
>at Swansea University, the Department of 
>Germanic Studies at the University of Sheffield 
>and the IGRS.
>
>The onset of the Enlightenment brought with it a 
>new interest in things foreign: the literati 
>learnt languages, avidly read and translated 
>foreign literature, travelled extensively, and 
>began corresponding and building up networks 
>with colleagues abroad. The events of 1789 and 
>Napoleon's subsequent progress through Europe 
>produced literary responses from a range of 
>German writers. Although France remained in the 
>avant-garde through much of the nineteenth 
>century in terms of politics and cultural 
>tastes, writers in the German states were also 
>well-placed to react to influences from the 
>South, East and North. The lack of a 
>clearly-defined cultural and political centre 
>for the German states until 1871 may have 
>encouraged some writers to respond to influences 
>from foreign capitals, especially Paris and 
>London. In other cases, it could be argued that 
>this circumstance delayed the dissemination of 
>certain ideas and fashions.
>
>How European was German women's writing of the 
>eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? What 
>opportunities did women writers have to 
>participate in cross-cultural interchange? How 
>did they react to developments outside their own 
>borders in their writing? The conference aims to 
>open up new perspectives on German women's 
>writing of the eighteenth and nineteenth 
>centuries by exploring how it engages with the 
>cosmopolitanism which was so characteristic of 
>much of this era. 20-minute papers are invited 
>on the following themes (and related areas):
>
>* German women as readers/reviewers/translators of European literature
>* Literary engagements with the foreign
>* Correspondence and contact between German 
>women and their European colleagues
>* The view from exile
>* Travel writing
>* Reception of German women's writing abroad
>
>Please send abstracts (200-300 words) with a 
>working title to both of the co-ordinators by 30 
>September 2009:
>
><mailto:[log in to unmask]>Dr Hilary Brown
><mailto:[log in to unmask]>Dr Caroline Bland
>
>Jane Lewin
>
>Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies
>
>University of London School of Advanced Study
>
>Room ST 272, Senate House
>
>Malet Street, GB- London WC1E 7HU
>Telephone 0044 (0)20 7862 8966
>
>Website www.igrs.sas.ac.uk

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The German Studies Call for Papers List
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