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The green dots in the large Sibley book were not pin points of records; just 
indicators of occaisional strays in that general part of the country. The 
maps in the smaller pocket-sized Eastern and Western Sibley guides that came 
out later use green shading to show general areas where the species may 
occur rarely. The shaded areas give a better idea where the species may show 
up than did the larger green dots, but they do not define a range or 
represent a continuum of past records. There are a few small green dots in 
otherwise unshaded areas of the pocket-sized books. These should have more 
meaning than the larger green dots in the original Sibley book, if only 
because Paul Lehman and his network of informers put a lot of work in on the 
range maps between the publication of the original large Sibley book and the 
subsequent publication of the pocket-sized guides. The small green dots 
apparently indicate isolated records, although I'm not sure how much effort 
Paul made to place the dot precisely where the record occurred.

Paul's Missouri informers were myself, Mark Robbins and Bill Rowe. He has 
used some of the same information to update the range maps in the 5th 
National Geographic Edition as well as its eastern and western guides.


Bob Fisher
Independence, MO
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