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Dear Diana,
 
Vis-a-vis the temporal and the spiritual aspects of "In the mountains, there you feel free",
I was just reminded of the protagonist of Ash-Wednesday who engages himself in a
pursuit different from, say, Marie's. I wrote "In 'Ash-Wednesday', the poet speaks of a different life "between the rocks". Obviously there are neither any "mountains" here, per se, nor yet any feeling of "freedom". 
 
However, Eliot does use "rocks" and "mountains" interchangeably in the lines "Here is no water but only rocks..." in What the Thunder Said. Please look up the lines and let me know, for I may be wrong in this assumption.
 
Regards,
 
CR


--------Original Message-----
From: Diana Manister <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Sent: Fri, 3 Apr 2009 1:00 pm
Subject: Re: In the mountains (was: Gerontion)



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Dear CR:
 
I see nothing in the quotes from Ash Wednesday that refers to mountains, or to feeling free for that matter.
 
Diana