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In 1934 (about--I don't have the text here), He went on a walking tour in Scotland and Wales with a friend he went to stay with right after he left Vivienne.  He was apparently quite distressed at the time.  I don't know of any documentation of who, if anyone, he met in Scotland at the time, but the fact is that he was hiding from Viv by staying with a friend.  And he seems to have been always guilty about his marriage and Viv later.  So my point was that he wrote this at a very difficult time in his life, as he did TWL--but a different kind of difficulty. 
 
One cannot quite "measure and weigh" anything emotional or personal can one?  It is not a matter of so quantitative a reading.  But just as the other "Landscape" poems are early forms of the kind of work he did in Four Q, "Rannoch" describes ancient wars and sounds of battle, as does "Little Gidding," but in a way very different from the scenes in Little Gidding.  I think it is unique in his work.  I've written about it, but its published in conference proceedings from Tbilisi, Georgia, and probably not very available.  I want to expand it, so it is in development for a longer discussion.
Cheers,
Nancy 

>>> Marcia Karp <[log in to unmask]> 4/18/2009 5:50 PM >>>
Dear Nancy,
    What are you basing the following (in bold) on?
I don't think Eliot's reaction to Rannoch was so much connected to WWI as to the condition of his own life in 1934, but he was clearly deeply affected, and I think it stayed with him as a major emotional source in his work.
    I mean how can you have access to the connections?  How can you measure and weigh them?

Best,
Marcia


Nancy Gish wrote:
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Dear Diana,
 
I don't really keep up on Pound, but I would think someone must have. 
 
I don't think Eliot's reaction to Rannoch was so much connected to WWI as to the condition of his own life in 1934, but he was clearly deeply affected, and I think it stayed with him as a major emotional source in his work.
Cheers,
Nancy