Print

Print


Read the full passage again, please.  Lear approves of adultery in that speech.  You made it say what you wanted it to say by your editing.

Marcia

Chokh Raj wrote:
[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
I did not ascribe these words to Shakespeare to mean "he" said them -- I wrote:
"And Shakespeare would say", i.e. "he would have said these words" vis-a-vis
Vivienne's adultery with Russell.
 
I wrote earlier : "Where art thou, Shakespeare? You should have read this."
 
CR


>>> Chokh Raj <[log in to unmask]> 4/20/2009 8:21 PM >>>
And Shakespeare would say:
 
What was thy cause? —
Adultery? —
.         .         .         .         .         .
Down from the waist they are centaurs,
Though women all above.
But to the girdle do the gods inherit,
Beneath is all the fiend's; there's hell, there's darkness,
There is the sulphurous pit; burning, scalding, stench, consumption! —
   fie, fie, fie! pah, pah!
Give me an ounce of civet, good apothecary,
to sweeten my imagination: there's money for thee.
 
          ~ William Shakespeare, King Lear
 


--- On Mon, 4/20/09, Rickard Parker <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

From: Rickard Parker <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: T.S. Eliot : "The critics" versus "the critics"
To: [log in to unmask]
Date: Monday, April 20, 2009, 2:29 PM

> I was just reminded of what the Chorus says in 'Murder in the Cathedral' :
> "I have tasted / The savour of putrid flesh in the spoon".
> It's worth reading the full chorus online (pp. 66-8) at
> http://books.google.com/books?id=lc3krClq6bEC&pg=PA67&lpg=PA67&dq#PPA66,M1
> Where art thou, Shakespeare? You should have read this !!!
> CR


For years a secret shame destroyed my peace -
I'd not read Eliot, Auden or MacNeice
But then I had a thought that brought me hope -
Neither had Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope.
    ~ Justin Richardson, 'Take Heart, Illiterates', 1966