Print

Print


Hi All,

I just put up a web page with the photo-maps to Blue Grosbeak Trail.

Remember, as Jim pointed out, to beware of hunters and (to my fellow
neophyte birders), also respect the other birders that may already be
positioned for viewing.

Here's the link: www.rgspemkt.com/BGTrail

When I was there yesterday, there were quite a few cars in the parking lot.
I was expecting to have a fellow birder (addict) "pop-up" at any time and
yell at this neophyte birder for spooking good birds away. <G>

I say "addict" because I really hadn't planned to go there yesterday,
so I was tromping around for an hour (19 degrees at the time) with no
coat, etc., in just jeans, t-shirt and a regular cotton shirt. That confirmed
to me that all of this is definitely addictive.

I noticed what I believe were a number (10, or so) hawthorn trees in the
area. There is one right between and slightly to the south of the two
cedar trees Jim mentions. There are also a number interspersed in
the multi flora rose "hedgerow". Is it correct to assume that the hawthorn
trees, along with the multi flora "cover" is why Vlad hangs around this
area??

There are two photos of him on the new web page. One has the mouse
in his beak (Vlad the NOSH, having a nosh!), the other shows him perched
on the top of a hawthorn tree, at least I think that's what the tree is.

John Hitzeman
Troy, MO



Sent: Sun, 25 Jan 2009 11:56 am
Subject: NORTHERN SHRIKE (Vlad) remains at Weldon Spring CA

Hi Mobirders, 
 
I went by Weldon Spring CA this morning to look for the Northern Shrike and what other sparrows and dickie birds might get in my way. I found Vlad (NOSH) much further back down the Blue Grosbeak trail than where Joe Eades originally found it in December. To get to the bird where I saw it this morning, follow the trail/road from the east end of the parking lot. At the fork, bear right and continue to the top of the hill. At this point if you look up the road in front of you, there are two large cedar trees on the right side of the road with deciduous trees growing out of them. The shrike was on the right-most of these trees. As I tried to get closer, the bird flushed and I lost it. I walked a bit further looking for sparrows, and when I turned around, the shrike was back at it's post. This time it allowed me to get very close as I walked by on the road, and after moving to a couple of other trees, it returned to the initial spot. It may be somewhat reproducible at this location. 
There were numerous rabbit and a few goose hunters at this location, so if you go, blaze orange might be a good idea. 
 
Good luck, 
Jim Malone 
in St. Charles Co. 
 
------------------------------------------------------------ 
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum 
List archives: https://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html 
------------------------------------------------------------
The Audubon Society of Missouri's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
List archives: https://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html